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MAYSLES CINEMA: CALENDAR / CURATED BY SYLVIA SAVADJIAN
DIRECTED BY JESSICA GREEN
 
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Union Square Awards
Support provided in part by the Union Square Awards, a project of the Tides Center,

NYSCA

The New York State Council on the Arts,

Union Square Awards
and public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.
 
 

Sylvia Savadjian curates films at the Maysles Cinema. She previously worked as a publicist at the documentary distributor Icarus Films, and the public relations agencies Donna Daniels PR and Sophie Gluck & Associates. She's also worked as the Director of Theatrical Marketing at Kino International and in marketing and business development at HBO.

The box office is open for advance ticket purchases Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, & Friday, 12 - 6 pm, and one hour before the start of all events until they end. If the door is locked during these hours, knock on the store front window. Ticket-holders arriving 15 minutes before showtime are guaranteed a seat inside the theater. Overflow seating available for sold out shows.
Tickets $10 suggested donation, unless otherwise noted.
Members only: Reserve your seat at reservations@mayslesinstitute.org
Become a member>
Our Cinema and one of our restrooms are handicap accessible. Feel free to call the Box Office at (212) 537-6843 if you have any additional questions or concerns.

 
CURATED BY SYLVIA SAVADJIAN - PAST SCREENINGS

JANUARY 2010
Thursday,   
Jan. 7
7:30 pm
 

THE PEOPLE'S CHOICE
Audience Suggested Films! Suggest a film: cinema@mayslesinstitute.org
This month's screening conceived by Sylvia Savadjian

The Cry of Jazz
Dir. Edward Bland, 1959, 34 min.
The Cry of Jazz is filmmaker, composer and arranger Edward O. Bland's essay on the politics of music and race. Not only is this one of the earliest documentaries made by an African American, it is arguably the first time an African American director openly challenges assumptions of white supremacy on film. Bland makes an early argument that Jazz is an inherently Black art form, rooted in Black experience, being diluted by White imitators to its own peril. Bland makes the case by grounding Sun Ra's soundtrack in poignant images of Black urban experience and cultural life compared with the "cool" sound and posture of White jazz performers. This argument has fueled debate and cultural production from the Black Arts movement through the current "post-racial" period. "Edward O. Bland's...insights into the art and politics of jazz—as seen in this short work of philosophical agitprop, from 1959—are profound."-Richard Brody (The New Yorker, 1/11/10)

Followed by discussion with film critic, Armond White.
Mr. White is an iconoclast with un-predictable takes on popular culture. Most recently he has raised a stir with his review of Lee Daniels' film, Precious, as a modern day Birth of a Nation. In spite of, or perhaps on account of his unorthodox views, Armond White is highly respected in the film world and serves as head of the New York Film Critic's Circle.

Co-sponsored by The National Jazz Museum of Harlem

 

 

 


APRIL 2011
Wednesday,
April 27th,
7:30pm
  Beyond Bullets: Gun Violence in America
Curated by Sylvia Savadjian (A Portion of the Evening's Proceeds Will Be Donated to Harlem Mothers S.A.V.E.)
  Living for 32
Living for 32

Bullets in the Hood

A Harlem Mother


 

Living for 32
Dir. Kevin Breslin, 2010, 40 min.
Living for 32 is the inspirational story of Colin Goddard, a survivor of the tragic gun shooting massacre which occurred on the Virginia Tech campus, April 16th, 2007. The winning combination of Colin's passion, charisma and optimism has commanded the attention of the American public and media since the devastating incident which left 32 dead and 17 injured. In Living for 32, Colin shares an intimate account of terror he and his classmates endured and the courageous journey of renewal and hope he chose to pursue.
Film Website>

Bullets In the Hood: A Bed-Stuy Story
Terrence Fisher and Daniel Howard, 2005, 22 min.
Winner of the 2005 Sundance Grand Jury Prize in Short Filmmaking, Bullets in the Hood: A Bed Stuy Story contains frightening images that could only be captured by someone like co-director Terrence Fisher, who has spent his entire life in the projects and experienced the tragedy of gun violence as a seemingly inescapable part of life. Says indieWIRE, "...a great example of how Guerilla film making can play an important social function by bringing forth new and intimate voices and subjects that are normally glossed over by local evening news casts."
Film website>

A Harlem Mother
Ivana Todorovic, 2009, 14 min.
In 1998, 18 year old LaTraun Parker made a documentary about the difficulties of growing up in Harlem. Eights years later he was shot dead on the street. Today his mother Jean Corbett-Parker (co-founder of not-for-profit Harlem Mothers S.A.V.E.) fights youth gun violence and helps other parents survive the pain through her organization, Harlem Mothers. Weaving footage from LaTraun's own film with scenes from Jean's new life today, A Harlem Mother is a short documentary that tells this tragic and inspirational story from the dual perspectives of mother and son.
Film Website>

Post screening panel with:

Kevin Breslin, Director, Living for 32 : Kevin's directorial credits include A Smile Gone, But Where? and Women of Rockaway. His latest, Living for 32 premiered at the 2011 Sundance Film Festival.
Colin Goddard, Subject, Living for 32: Shot 4 times at the Virginia Tech shootings which left 32 dead and 17 more wounded, after finishing his college degree, Colin decided to volunteer for the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, the nation's largest gun control organization.
Jean Corbett-Parker, Co-founder Harlem Mothers S.A.V.E.: A longtime resident of Harlem, Jean was moved to start Harlem Mothers S.A.V.E. after her son, LaTraun Parker, died on April 28, 2001 outside a nightclub at the corner of Seventh Avenue and 131th Street.
Jackie Rowe-Adams has lost two children to gun violence. Along with Jean Corbett-Parker, she co-founded Harlem Mothers S.A.V.E. She is featured in Living for 32 with Colin Goddard.
Ya Girl Nicolette is a Harlem based rapper, spoken word artist, and anti-gun violence activist with Street Corner Resources. She has performed all over the tri-state area in the past 3 years.
Stephanie Skaff: Director of DCTV's anti-gun violence media campaign, "Beyond Bullets". Before coming to DCTV, Stephanie worked as a producer, fundraiser and arts administrator throughout NYC.


MARCH 2011
Monday,   
Mar. 21st
7:00 pm
  True Crime New York
A meditation on the complexity of "true" crime in the rotten apple - from the Central Park Jogger Case to Giuliani Time, Bernie Goetz to Bernie Madoff.
  True Crime NY logoDark DaysDark Days
credit: Marc Singer
   

Introduced by David Dinkins, the 106th Mayor of New York City:

Dark Days

Dir. Marc Singer, 2000, 94 min.
Dark Days is the multi-award winning documentary from Marc Singer about a community of homeless people illegally living in the "Freedom" tunnel beneath Manhattan, unofficially named for the graffiti artist Chris "Freedom" Pape and his series of pieces that famously adorn the endless tunnel. The film depicts a way of life that is unimaginable to most of those who walk the streets above. In the pitch black of the tunnel, rats swarm through piles of garbage as high-speed trains leaving Penn Station tear through the darkness. Dark Days is an eye-opening work that sheds a spotlight on a world generally shrouded in darkness and now provides a look back at a literal underground community at the turn of 20th century New York City.

AFTER THE SCREENING: Dir. Marc Singer and Mary Brosnahan, Executive Director of the Coalition for the Homeless

A portion of the proceeds from this screening will go to the Coalition for the Homeless. Evening curated by Sylvia Savadjian.


AUGUST 2011
Thursday,  
August 4th,
7:30 pm
 

Master Class: Steve James
Identifying and surveying exemplary careers in documentary production through an expansive lens. Curated by Sylvia Savadjian.

At the Death House Door
Dir. Steve James and Peter Gilbert, 2008, 94 min.
At the Death House Door follows the remarkable career journey of Carroll Pickett, who served 15 years as the death house chaplain to the infamous "Walls" prison unit in Huntsville, Texas. During that time he presided over 95 executions, including the very first lethal injection done anywhere in the world. After each execution, Pickett recorded an audiotape account of that fateful day. The film also tells the story of Carlos De Luna, a convict whose execution affected Pickett more than any other. Pickett firmly believed the man was innocent and two Chicago Tribune reporters turn up evidence that strongly suggests he was right.

 

Master Class At the Death House Door


FEBRUARY 2012
Wednesday,
Feb. 29th,
7:30 pm
  Doc Watchers and Sylvia Savadjian Present
A Black History Month Special:

Doc Watchers is a Harlem, community-based, documentary film screening club and series curated by Hellura Lyle. Sylvia Savadjian is a regularly contributing curator at the Maysles Cinema.
 

Doc Watchers LogoMore Than a MonthMore Than a MonthMore Than a MonthMore Than a Month

   
More Than a Month
Shukree Hassan Tilghman, 2012, 60 min.
Shukree Hassan Tilghman, a 29-year-old African-American filmmaker, sets out on a cross-country campaign to end Black History Month. He stops in various cities, wearing a sandwich board, to solicit signatures on his petition to end the observance. He explains that relegating Black History Month to the coldest, shortest month of the year is an insult, and that black history is not separate from American history. Through this thoughtful and humorous journey, he explores what the treatment of history tells us about race and equality in a "post-racial" America. His road trip begins in Washington, D.C., crisscrosses the country during Black History Month 2010, and ends with an epilogue one year later. Each stop along the journey explores Black History Month as it relates to four ideas: education, history, identity, and commercialism. Tilghman's campaign to end Black History Month is actually a provocative gambit to open a public conversation about the idea of ethnic heritage months, and whether relegating African American history to the shortest month of the year — and separating it from American history on the whole — denigrates the role of black people and black culture throughout American history. But it is also a seeker's journey to reconcile his own conflicting feelings about his own identity, history, and convictions.  More Than a Month is not just about a yearly tradition, or history, or being black in America. It is about what it means to be an American, to fight for one's rightful place in the American landscape, however unconventional the means, even at the risk of ridicule or misunderstanding. It is a film  about discovering oneself.


After the screening: Q&A with director Shukree Hassan Tilghman and Anthony Riddle, Managing Director of the Maysles Insitute and descendant of Dr. Carter Woodson, creator of Negro History Week.

Reception to follow, co-presented by DocWatchers

JANUARY 2012
Wednesday,
Jan. 11th
  ALL ME and an Evening with Winfred Rembert
Curated by Sylvia Savadjian
 

Harlem One StopRistorante Sette PaniAll Me

6:30 pm   Reception sponsored by Harlem One Stop and Sette Pani


7:30 pm

 

 


ALL ME: The Life and Times of Winfred Rembert
Dir. Vivian Ducat, 2011, 75 min.
With his intensely autobiographical paintings depicting the day-to-day existence of African Americans in the segregated South, Winfred Rembert has preserved an important, if often disturbing, chapter of American history. His indelible images of toiling in the cotton fields, singing in church, dancing in juke joints, or working on a chain gang are especially powerful, not just because he lived every moment, but because he experienced so much of the injustice and bigotry they show as recently as the 1960s and 70s. Now in his sixties, Rembert has developed a growing following among collectors and connoisseurs, and enjoyed a number of tributes and exhibitions of his work. In ALL ME: The Life and Times of Winfred Rembert, the artist relives his turbulent life, abundantly visualized by his extensive paintings and, in a series of intimate reminiscences, shows us how even the most painful memories can be transformed into something meaningful and beautiful. A glowing portrait of how an artist—and his art—is made, ALL ME is also a triumphant saga of race in contemporary America.
Film Website>
Watch clips from the film>

"ALL ME:The Life And Times Of Winfred Rembert" screening write up at Indie Wire blog 'Shadow and Act: On Cinema of The African Diaspora'>

POST SCREENING: Q&A with director Vivian Ducat and the film's subject Winfred Rembert.

JULY 2012
Wednesday,
July 11th
7:30 pm
  ALL ME: The Life and Times of Winfred Rembert
Back By Popular Demand!

Curated by Sylvia Savadjian
 

All Me

   
ALL ME: The Life and Times of Winfred Rembert
Dir. Vivian Ducat, 2011, 75 min.
With his intensely autobiographical paintings depicting the day-to-day existence of African Americans in the segregated South, Winfred Rembert has preserved an important, if often disturbing, chapter of American history. His indelible images of toiling in the cotton fields, singing in church, dancing in juke joints, or working on a chain gang are especially powerful, not just because he lived every moment, but because he experienced so much of the injustice and bigotry they show as recently as the 1960s and 70s. Now in his sixties, Rembert has developed a growing following among collectors and connoisseurs, and enjoyed a number of tributes and exhibitions of his work. In ALL ME: The Life and Times of Winfred Rembert, the artist relives his turbulent life, abundantly visualized by his extensive paintings and, in a series of intimate reminiscences, shows us how even the most painful memories can be transformed into something meaningful and beautiful. A glowing portrait of how an artist—and his art—is made, ALL ME is also a triumphant saga of race in contemporary America.
Official Film Website>
Watch clips from the film>


Q&A with director Vivian Ducat and artist Winfred Rembert to follow screening

JULY 2012
Friday,
July 13th
to
  Jock Docs Presents
Curated by Sylvia Savadjian
 
Thursday,
July 19th,

Each night
at 7:30 pm
except for a
2:00 pm
Matinee on
Sunday,
July 15th

One Week Run!
  Ballplayer: Pelotero
U.S. Theatrical Premiere
Ross Finkel, Trevor Martin and Jon Paley, 2011, 73 min.
This compelling documentary narrated by John Leguizamo is a gritty and never before seen look inside the world of Major League Baseball (MLB) training camps in the Dominican Republic.  For 16-year-old Dominican baseball players such as Miguel Angel and Jean Carlos, the only real chance to escape crushing poverty comes on July 2nd, the day they become eligible to sign professional baseball contracts. Pelotero provides an intimate portrait of two prospects as they navigate the calculating, mercenary and often corrupt elements that surround Major League Baseball's recruitment of the Island's top talent.  Filmmakers Ross Finkel, Trevor Martin and Jonathan Paley take you inside this never before seen world for an up close and personal look at the cost of the American dream. Executive produced by former ballplayer and Red Sox Manager Bobby Valentine.

"What gives Pelotero its edge is a nexus of corruption, exploitation and betrayal that transforms this well-shot, cannily edited item to an engrossing expose."
- Variety


Friday, July 13th: Post-screening Q&A with Co-Director Ross Finkel

Saturday, July 14th: Post-screening Q&A with Co-Directors Ross Finkel and Trevor Martin, followed by a reception.

Wednesday, July 18th: Pre-Screening Maysles Cinema Members' reception at 6:30pm.

Thursday, July 19th: Post-screening Q&A with Co-Director Jon Paley and Trevor Martin

NOVEMBER 2012
Fri. 11/23
at 5:15pm &
7:30pm
-
Sat. 11/24
3:15pm,
5:15pm, &
7:30pm
-
Mon. 11/26
through
Thurs. 11/29
at 7:30pm

@ the Maysles
Cinema


&
*Nov. 25th*
at 4:00pm
@ the Dempsey
Center
  True Crime New York and Sylvia Savadjian Present:
NOTE: Thursday night tickets going fast! A limited number of tickets still available at the box office for all shows. Please arrive early to ensure a seat in the theater - 7:15 latest if you are already a ticket holder. (Overflow seating available for latecomers)

The Central Park Five
U.S. Theatrical Premiere
Dir. Ken Burns, David McMahon, Sarah Burns, 2012, 119 min.
Ken Burns co-directed, wrote and produced The Central Park Five with his daughter, Sarah Burns (author of the book "The Central Park Five: A Chronicle of a City Wilding") and her husband, David McMahon. In 1989, five black and Latino teenagers from Harlem were arrested and later convicted of brutally beating and raping a white woman in Central Park. New York Mayor Ed Koch called it the "crime of the century" and it remains to date one of the biggest media stories of our time. The five each spent between 6 and 13 years in prison before a shocking confession from a serial rapist and DNA evidence proved their innocence. Set against a backdrop of a decaying city beset by violence and racial tension, The Central Park Five tells the story of how five lives were upended by the rush to judgment by police, a sensationalist media and a devastating miscarriage of justice. An official selection of the 2012 Cannes and Toronto International Film Festivals and closing night of DOC NYC.

NOT TO BE MISSED:
****Sunday, November 25th, 4:00pm****
@ the Oberia D. Dempsey Center Auditorium

127 West 127th Street (between Lenox and Adam Clayton Powell)
WIth a post-screening Q&A with dirs. Sarah Burns and David McMahon and members of the Central Park Five, Raymond Santana, Kevin Richardson, Yusef Salaam, Korey Wise.

****Tuesday, November 27th, 7:30pm****
Post-screening Q&A with Yusef Salaam (The Central Park Five), Korey Wise (The Central Park Five), Angela Bronner (Editor of Uptown Magazine) and Tambay Obenson (Editor of Shadow and Act). Sponsored by Shadow and Act.


****Wednesday, November 28th, 7:30pm****
Post-screening Q&A and book signing with Director Sarah Burns.


Speaker Bios:
Yusef Salaam, one of the five who was falsely accused and convicted in the Central Park jogger case, is a father, poet and motivational speaker. He is on the board for the Campaign to End the Death Penalty.

Sarah Burns is author of "The Central Park Five: The Untold Story." Burns' research on the case was the impetus for a film, which she co-directed with her father filmmaker Ken Burns and husband, David McMahon. "The Central Park Five" is her first book.

Angela Bronner is editor of Uptown Magazine, a Harlem-based lifestyle publication. She was formerly the senior editor at AOL's Black Voices and editor at Source Magazine.

Tambay Obenson is a filmmaker, writer and editor of Shadow and Act. He lives in Brooklyn, NY.

A limited number of First Edition Hard Cover copies of Sarah Burns' book "The Central Park Five: A Chronicle of A City Wilding" available at the box office. Sarah Burns will be signing books at the Dempsey, Sunday and at the Maysles Cinema after the Wednesday, Nov. 28th screening.


 
 
The Maysles Cinema is located at:
343 Malcolm X Boulevard / Lenox Avenue (between 127th and 128th Streets)