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MAYSLES CINEMA PRESS: FILMS AND EVENTS
 

"Free Screening of Sugarhill Gang Doc in NYC Tonight"

"Love hip-hop? Love justice? The 4th of July may be over but Maysles Cinema's Summer of Music keeps the spirit alive with a special "now moved indoors" free screening of Roger Paradiso's I Want My Name Back - the story of how founding members of the legendary Sugarhill Gang waged a 30+-year battle to rightfully own their hip-hop legacy - along with a special, live performance by some of the biggest legends in the game."
- East Village Radio, July 10, 2013

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"Maysles Cinema To Screen Today Sugarhill Gang doc with Special Performance"

"Roger Paradiso’s Sugarhill Gang feature documentary, I Want My Name Back, and will feature a special performance of Rapper’s Delight with Legendary MCs Wonder Mike, Master Gee and Grandmaster Caz (The Cold Crush Brothers) and special guests Melle Mel (Grandmaster Flash), Dana Dane, DJ Wiz (Kid N’ Play) and Grandmaster Dee (Whodini), Keith LeBlanc, Vernon Reid and Doug Winbish (Living Colour)."
- Wilson Morales, blackfilm.com, July 10, 2013

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"Finding Honor in the Final Send-Off"

"The morbid meets the deeply spiritual in Christine Turner’s assured documentary “Homegoings,” a portrait of Isaiah Owens, a Harlem undertaker, as he practices his profession: embalming and touching up human remains for display at viewings and directing mourners and pallbearers at burial and memorial services. But the film, produced in part by the public-television series “POV,” and to be broadcast on Monday, in addition to a weeklong stint at the Maysles Cinema, is also a portrait of a sacrament as practiced in an African-American community, and a celebration of tradition"
- Andy Webster, New York Times, June 23, 2013

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"Could an hour be spent any better than at Christine Turner's Homegoings? Nope."

"The film is only 57 minutes long, but my god, how much worthwhile thought and genuine emotion is produced here! Isaiah himself is clearly aware of what it means to be constantly in the presence of death, and what this does to you. As he puts it, "I'm always at my funeral." Homegoings, from Peralta Pictures, opens a week-long theatrical run tomorrow -- Monday, June 24 -- at the Maysles Cinema, as part of its Documentary in Bloom series."
- James van Maanen, Trust Movies, June 23, 2013

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"Review: 'Homegoings'"

"Homegoings is Christine Tucker's rousing, roof-raising documentary about legendary funeral director Isiah Owens' thriving business in Harlem. The film presents a stirring and fascinating view of African American funeral rituals and their celebratory nature."
- Jennifer Merin, About.com, June 24, 2013

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"Documentary In Bloom: Homegoings"

"Ever since he was a boy growing up on a farm in South Carolina, Isaiah Owens, the son of a sharecropper, has been burying the dead, beginning with small animals...His company motto is “Where Beauty Softens Your Grief,” and that is evident throughout Christine Turner’s new documentary, Homegoings."
- This Week in New York, June 23, 2013

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"Hotshots of Street Basketball ‘Doin’ It in the Park,’ a Film About Pick-Up Basketball"

"The film, an exuberant introduction to the rich lore of the city game, teaches some basics, recounts some stories and talks with some of the most famous asphalt gods."
- Daniel M. Gold, The New York Times, May 21, 2013

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"Documentary is an ode to NYC playground basketball"

"A new documentary, "Doin' it in the Park,'' is a loving ode to the blacktop world of New York City pick-up. With more than 700 courts, it's the mecca of pick-up basketball, featuring places like Rucker Park in Harlem and the West 4th St. court, a kind of fish bowl of nonstop basketball on view for West Village commuters and tourists. Basketball is woven into the asphalt fabric of New York."
- Jake Coyle, Sports Illustrated, May 18, 2013

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"Film documents NYC playground basketball"

"Half-moon hoops, double rims, chain-linked fences for out-of-bounds lines and no net that anyone can recall...They tried to capture the culture of New York basketball, one dented backboard at a time. Their urban odyssey took them from rough Coney Island courts (the point guard hotbed that produced Stephan Marbury and Sebastian Telfair) to the daily prisoner games of Rikers Island."
- NBA News, May 18, 2013

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"Doin' it in the Park: Pick-Up Basketball, New York City"

"...the film captures the rhythm and beat of street hoops, from three-on-three, half court, and full court to Horse and 21, with guys even shooting into garbage cans, milk crates, and monkey bars if no courts were available."
- This Week in New York, May 22, 2013

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"Review: Doin' It in the Park: Pickup Basketball, NYC"

"The film does an exceptional job of illustrating street basketball's value as a cultural movement, one that crosses boundaries of class, gender, race, and skill level. The one defining prerequisite seems to be nothing more than a desire to play—and play hard."
- Drew Hunt, Slant Magazine, May 19, 2013

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"For love of the game: Bobbito Garcia & Kevin Couliau's DOIN' IT IN THE PARK proves one of our best basketball movies"

"...as this tremendously entertaining documentary moves on, and we meet some of the great pick-up players, as well as some notable ex-NBA stars who talk about their own experience with pick-up basketball, it becomes increasingly clear that the filmmakers have stuck documentary gold."
- James van Maanen, Trust Movies, May 18, 2013

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"New Documentary Examines Pick-Up Basketball Across NYC"

"Garcia and filmmaker Kevin Couliau set out to tell the story of basketball like it has never been seen before."
- Bree Driscoll, NY1, May 21, 2013

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"A Pickup Basketball Primer from Doin' It in the Park's Bobbito Garcia"

"One of the great things about New York in the summertime is you never have to go more than a few blocks for a game of pickup basketball. Today the big city (a breeding ground for the likes of Kareem, Dr. J, and Melo) is home to more than 700 courts, a few of which are practically hallowed ground. "New York has such a rich history when it comes to pickup," says Bobbito Garcia, co-director of the irresistibly vibrant new documentary Doin' It in the Park, about the game's rituals, merits and impact on society."
- Craigh Barboza, GQ, May 22, 2013

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"Streetball With 'Doin' It In The Park'"

"'Doin' It In The Park' hits theaters on May 22nd. The story of streetball is told in this documentary by baller, DJ & filmmaker Bobbito Garcia and filmmaker Kevin Couliau. They joins us along with legendary streetballer Pee Wee Kirkland."
- Huffington Post, May 22, 2013

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"Bobbito Garcia and Kevin Couliau talk Doin’ It In the Park: Pick Up Basketball"

"A self-proclaimed “pick-up basketball activist,” Bobbito Garcia has played in 35 countries throughout five continents, and has acted as an ambassador for the sport, giving clinics and donating sneakers in multiple developing areas...Kevin Couliau is widely recognized as the most prolific outdoor basketball photographer of the last decade."
- Wilson Morales, Blackfilm.com, May 21, 2013

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"The Weekend Warrior: Doin’ It in the Park"

"Garcia, a New York radio legend, comes from the street pick-up ball scene himself, which allows him unprecedented access to get a lot of the legends of the game to talk frankly about what it's like to be on the courts and how that has become their family. "
- Edward Douglas, Comingsoon.net, May 22, 2013

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"Highlights: Doin’ It in the Park"

"A love letter orally conveyed by dozens of figures from borough legends to NBA all-stars, the documentary provides exactly what those who flock to it want: a sense of fellowship in their ardor many others (including myself) don’t understand."
- Matt Biancardi,Tiny Mix Tapes

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"Bobbito Garcia on Doin’ It in the Park: Pick-Up Basketball"

"...filmmakers and pick-up basketball enthusiasts Bobbito Garcia and Kevin Couliau set out to create the most comprehensive document of New York City’s summer, outdoor pick-up basketball scene by visiting 180 courts throughout all five of the city’s boroughs. Shot in a breakneck 75 summer days during 2011, their debut documentary has an immediacy and intimacy that speaks to its homemade vibe, even amongst former and current NBA players like Kenny Anderson and Brandon Jennings, regulars on New York’s playground courts."
- Brandon Harris, Filmmaker Magazine, May 22, 2013

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"Film Review: Doin' it in the Park: Pick-Up Basketball, New York City"

"Documentary about New York street basketball offers great technical quality and admirably insider interviews, but celebrates the subject unquestioningly, without a larger context."
- Frank Lovece, Film Journal, May 22, 2013

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"Doin' It in the Park: Pick-Up Basketball, NYC: Film Review"

"As freewheeling as the milieu it depicts, Doin’ It in the Park: Pickup Basketball, NYC chronicles the city’s outdoor “b-ball” scene with such exuberance that viewers might be tempted to leave halfway through and head to the nearest outdoor court."
- Frank Scheck, The Hollywood Reporter, May 22, 2013

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"In Theatres: DOIN’ IT IN THE PARK: PICK-UP BASKETBALL, NYC"

"Expressing a deep love not only for basketball but for the specific culture of New York City’s playgrounds, Garcia and Couliau’s film takes an expansive look at the lasting influence street ball has had on players and the game itself."
- Basil Tsiokos, What (Not) to Doc, May 22, 2013

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"'Doin' It In The Park' Opens At Maysles Tonight"

"Any New Yorker familiar with the hard-nosed West 4th street pick-up b-ball games that attract many onlookers (natives and tourists) should definitely be interested in seeing this new documentary feature titled Doin' It In The Park...The co-directors visited 180 courts throughout NYC's five boroughs to compile footage for the film, traveling to a majority of the locations by bicycle, carrying camera equipment and a ball in their backpacks, providing an unprecedented perspective on one of America's most popular, and accessible forms of recreation."
- Tambay A. Obenson, Indiewire, May 22, 2013

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"Doin’ It In The Park: Pick-up Basketball, NYC"

"This irresistibly entertaining doc sheds some light on the subculture of pick-up basketball, a form of street basketball played outdoors in New York City during the summertime. "
- Avi Offer, NYC Movie Guru, May 22, 2013

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"‘Doin’ It In The Park: Pick-up Basketball, NYC’ review"

"In “Doin’ It in the Park: Pick-Up Basketball, NYC,” co-directors Bobbito Garcia and Kevin Couliau — both first-time feature documentarians with roots in the scene — harness the infectious energy of the players who do battle on the city’s public courts, of which there are more than 700."
- Sara Stewart, New York Post, May 23, 2013

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"Doin’ It In The Park: Pick-Up Basketball, NYC"

"The joys of hustling, scuffling, and trash-talking on the basketball court are celebrated with boisterous (if skin-deep) enthusiasm by Doin’ It In The Park: Pick-Up Basketball, NYC."
- Nick Schager, A.V. Club, May 23, 2013

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"Filmmakers Robert Garcia, Kevin Couliau give NYC tradition their best shot in 'Doin' It in the Park' "

"Forget Madison Square Garden and the Barclays Center — basketball in New York is defined by the streets, not the stadiums.That’s the message behind the just-opened documentary “Doin’ It in the Park: Pick-Up Basketball, NYC,” which shines a light on the Big Apple’s prime playground sport."
- Bruce Fretts, NY Daily News, May 24, 2013

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"En entrevista: "Doin’ It In The Park: Pick-Up Basketball, NYC"

"Ya se encuentra en cartelera "Doin’ It In The Park: Pick-Up Basketball, NYC", un documental sobre el básquetbol que se practica en las calles y parques de la ciudad. Los directores de esta cinta Bobbito García y Kevin Couliau conversaron con Jerónimo Rodríguez."
- NY1 Noticias, May 24,2013

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"Doin' It In The Park, un documentaire rebondissant"

"Tous les joueurs de basket-ball ont débuté sur un terrain dans la rue. Le documentaire sportif Doin’ It In The Park, réalisé par le photographe français Kevin Couliau et le journaliste multi-casquette portoricain Bobbito Garcia, investit ces terrains avec une énergie communicative. Le film sort sur les écrans le 22 mai."
- Vincent Dozol, France-Amérique, May 15, 2013

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"NYT Critic's Pick: Skateboard Rebels Behind the Iron Curtain"

"These breathtaking displays of ollies and nose wheelies, however, aren’t just for the guys. Smartly incorporating Sasa Zivkovic’s sweet and simple animation, as well as an exhilarating, punk-infused soundtrack, Mr. Persiel extends the film’s appeal beyond hard-core skaters. In one of its most entertaining sequences, shot in Berlin’s Alexanderplatz in the mid-1980s, we watch dumbfounded as a blond skating god named Patrick travels the length of the square in a casual handstand."
- Jeannette Catsoulis, The New York Times, April 11, 2013

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"J. Hoberman:'This Ain’t California' Prints the Legend"

"Ain’t is movie’s the operative word. The no longer extant DDR may be a land of myth but it sure ain’t California and “This Ain’t California” ain’t exactly a hoax. The milieu really existed. Nor is the movie an exercise in simple ostalgia, although the emotional charge it delivers is dependent on its being set in a time and place where every athlete was officially an activist and any non-conformity was a political stance. It also ain’t a documentary fiction, which is to say, a movie that employs rudimentary sound dubbing and obvious montage to coax a story out of “real life.”"
- J. Hoberman, Art Info, April 12, 2013

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"Whether Truth or Fiction, This Ain't California Is Engrossing"

"An inspired mix of animation, a punk soundtrack, "archival" footage, and "contemporary" interviews, the film is a powerful consideration of loss and the struggle to make sense of competing truths about someone you thought you knew."
- Ernest Hardy, The Village Voice, April 12, 2013

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"This Ain't California"

"Who knew that skateboarding was such a big deal in the German Democratic Republic before the fall of the Wall? Martin Perciel’s documentaryThis Ain’t California explores this phenomenon, centering around a star shredder, Denis “Panik” Paracek, who led a ragtag band of East German skateboarders. "
- David Noh, Film Journal International, April 11, 2013

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"This Ain't California"

"Marten Persiel’s doc on the GDR’s street-skate scene combines vintage Super-8 footage, re-creations, cheeky asides (a lesson on how to do an ollie!) and middle-aged guys reminiscing about a mythical kid who allegedly introduced the sport to the country’s unwashed masses. "
- David Fear, Time Out New York, April 10, 2013

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"Review: I Fell For ‘This Ain’t California’ In More Ways Than One"

"I have to admit right away that I “fell for” the whole thing. That’s what happens when you avoid reading about a movie before you see it, I guess. All I knew was that it won a special award at Berlin last year and that it was a documentary about German skate culture. And I fell for it, too, meaning I fell in love with it. I found it to be electrifying, which can’t be ignored now that I know a lot of it is 'fake.'"
- Christopher Campbell, Film School Rejects, April 14, 2013

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"This Ain't California"

"Using real archival footage, re-created scenes, animation, and contemporary Super-8 footage posing as archival, Persiel, cinematographer Felix Leiberg, and editor Maxine Gödecke tell the story of Denis “Panik” Paracek, a 1980s skateboarding legend who has just been killed in Afghanistan. His old friends reunite to pay tribute to him, sharing tales of his remarkable skill, his fearlessness, and his ability to attract the opposite sex. While doing so, they paint a fascinating picture of East and West Germany in a decade that ended with the tearing down of the Berlin Wall."
- Mark Rifkin, This Week in New York, April 12, 2013

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"An Energetic Trip Into '80s German Skateboarding Culture & History"

"Even if Persiel's film is a slight hoax, this has so much energy flowing through it, that it just turns into both a good story, and a document of an undefined time and place that many teenagers finding themselves will experience. The mixed media approach is near seamless...and again, how he pulls off some of this truly original looking vintage footage is pretty astounding."
- Kevin Jagernauth, Indiewire, April 11, 2013

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"'I Ollied The Berlin Wall'"

"This Ain’t California might have the genre police up in arms—part of the point, certainly, for a film that memorializes a youthful dispensing with the rulebook—but the narrative on its own rides too smoothly to excite any protest. After a funeral for supreme daredevil Denis “Panik” Paraceck, close friends gather for an around-the-bonfire reunion; the film takes its cues from their remembrances, including much basic analysis of the personality of central mystery Panik (“ego-aggro bullshit” meets private reflection). "
- Benjamin Mercer, The L Magazine, April 10, 2013

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"In Theatres: THIS AIN’T CALIFORNIA"

"Utilizing Super-8mm footage (some re-created, other contemporary), Persiel wonderfully translates the gleeful joy in the stories his subjects share of resisting authority and attempting to adopt the trappings of Western popular culture within their tightly constrained, Soviet-controlled bubble – a form of political defiance despite their surface apoliticism. "
- Basil Tsiokos, What (Not) to Doc, April 10, 2013

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"Director Marten Persiel Discusses This Ain’t California"

"They say the film feels like being young, looking into the world with those eyes of possibility, with a lust for laughs and drama, and sex and adventure. On the other hand, I think people like you and me, our generation, the generation I speak about in the film, will always have special access to music like Anne Clark, Die Ärtze, Alphaville, Eight Dayz, and yes, those moments are for us, but in general, I tried to make a film that will work as well for my mother as it might for a teenager in Korea."
- Marten Persiel interviewed by Lauren Wissot, Filmmaker Magazine, April 10, 2013

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"This Ain't California"

"Featuring modern-day “interviews” with Panik’s contemporaries who have gathered in middle-age to reminisce about their former comrade, the fast-paced film features a jumble of modern and archival footage and trippy animation to recall the heady days in which their younger selves cavorted around Berlin’s endless concrete structures as their own distinctive form of youthful protest. The punk-rock flavored soundtrack adds to the anarchic atmosphere depicted."
- Frank Scheck, The Hollywood Reporter, April 12, 2012

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"This Ain't California"

"One of the best documentaries I’ve seen so far this year. Persiel immerses us in the memories of skateboard culture in the GDR, with voiceover narration coming from a reunited group sitting around a fire telling stories. It really helps that so much Super-8mm footage was shot through the years, so we get to see most of the 'flashbacks.' "
- Christopher Campbell, The Documentary Channel, April 12, 2013

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"Skateboarding in the GDR makes for an eye, mind and heart-opening experience"

"Please don't, when you discover that THIS AIN'T CALIFORNIA deals with skateboarding, relegate it, as I nearly did, to the status of "Are you kidding?" This really hybrid documentary -- from German filmmaker Marten Persiel, who directed and co-wrote it (with Ira Wedel) -- which won the Dialogue en Perspective prize at the 2012 Berlin Film Festival is certainly among the best of this year that I've seen so far"
- James van Maanen, Trust Movies, April 12, 2013

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"Skateboarding, Filmmaking, and Finding Freedom"

"The tricks are terrific, the kids lithe and athletic, the camerawork acrobatic, signaling the end of the GDR and the Stasi. The film assembles clips of whole squads of kids on boards, their hips swaying and their shorts short, of breakdancers in big pants and girls in big ‘80s hair, the camera zooming and swooping, expressing the delight of gaining access to “the wide world” through skateboards. All the movement is mesmerizing, even more so when you hear the counterpoints, an East German TV report warning of the latest trend from the West, an activity and commercial enterprise that “spreads like a virus, quickly devouring its way through the cities,” a man in a brown suit and a brown set odiously asserts."
- Cynthia Fuchs, PopMatters, April 12, 2013

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"This Ain’t California: Skate or Die & Unify"

"The architecture of East Berlin was a crime against art. Yet, for skateboarders, all that monstrous concrete was practically a workers’ paradise. "
- Joe Bendel, J.B. Spins, April 8, 2013

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"This Ain't California"

"it's imprudent to rebuke a film for being "fake" when its true aim is to capture a mood, or, in the specific case of This Ain't California, an ideal. Ultimately, the film is an examination of countercultures, the ways they form, how they prosper as communities, and what threatens their foundation. Panik himself may not have existed, but as a symbol of resilience and individualism, he's the ideal representation of the attitude held by the young East German skaters. "
- Drew Hunt, Slant Magazine, April 8, 2013

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"A Death in Paraguay Leads a Niece to Brutal Truths"

"The style is simple but the emotions highly sophisticated in “108 (Cuchillo de Palo),” Renate Costa’s insistently prodding documentary about the secret life of her gay uncle, Rodolfo Costa, under the oppressive government of the Paraguayan dictator Alfredo Stroessner."
- Jeannette Catsoulis, The New York Times, March 18, 2013

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"108 (Cuchillo de Palo)"

"It’s all pretty impressive for a documentary that starts off in the director’s backyard, with Costa waving a handheld camera around in her father’s face, poking at him for answers...evidence of the steamroller passion the director has devoted to uncovering the actual fate of her uncle, an openly gay man."
- Jesse Cataldo, Spectrum Culture, March 19, 2013

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"Seeing Paraguay's Past: '108 (Cuchillo de Palo)'"

"Renate remembers her uncle as a treat, as an adult who was fun. Her father does his best not to remember him at all. As she tries to recover Rodolfo’s past, she speaks with col. Several of them greet her, much like her father in this early scene, from a doorway or from behind a gate. This repetition of image is a function of the neighborhood housing in Asunción, but it also establishes a visual motif, shadows and gates, doors opening into darkness, and people standing in a literal thresholds, not quite in or out. Again and again, her interview subjects smile and share photos and stories with Renate, remembering her uncle and the difficulties he faced as a gay man."
- Cynthia Fuchs, PopMatters, March 20, 2013

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"108 Cuchillo de Palo"

"Despite this being her first film, Ms. Perdomo is very adept at developing character and revealing psychological complexity. Despite her father’s obdurate opposition to the idea that gays have a right to live as they please, there is a softer and more likeable side to him that she brings out in comically unproductive kite-flying and fishing expeditions. You can’t help but feel that his homophobia is partially explained by his failure to have ever become an adult. An infantilized Paraguayan male population is made to order for an authoritarian system.e"
- Louis Proyect, The Unrepentant Marxist, March 19, 2013

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"Docs in Theater: 108 (Cuchillo de Palo)"

"Here’s a special edition of Docs In Theaters for a film I haven’t yet seen but am looking forward to seeing — how can I resist a doc structured like a whodunit mystery? It’s opening on a Monday, and why not? When your cinema is named for two of the greatest documentarians of all time you can open films any day you want."
- Christopher Campbell, Documentary Channel, March 18, 2013

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"Family Secrets Under The Iron Fist In Paraguay"

"Costa herself cuts a powerful figure, her determined, laser-beam stare demanding nothing short of the full truth. She shows how Paraguay, despite becoming democratic and more accepting, hasn’t made a clean break with its violent past like Chile or Argentina; civil rights are still exercised with great caution. She masterfully weaves together the personal and the political, and eventually finds a few simple but powerful words that sum up the need for her father and his generation to come to terms with their personal responsibility for colluding with the government, but also for her own generation’s need to find understanding, compassion and forgiveness."
- Paul Sbrizzi, Hammer to Nail, March 18, 2013

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"108 (Cuchillo de Palo): Film Review"

"The numerical title of Renate Costa's 108 is code in Paraguay for homosexual, referring to lists of gay men that were issued for public ridicule during the long dictatorship of Alfredo Stroessner. Costa is concerned with one of the names on those lists -- that of her uncle Rodolfo, who died when she was a child and whose life is a mystery to her. Costa's inquiry into that life offers a deeply felt angle on the broader realities of life in Paraguay during the '80s; while the intimate film is unlikely to expand beyond niche theatrical bookings, it will affect many who see it."
- John DeFore, Hollywood Reporter, March 18, 2013

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"Documentary in Bloom: 108"

"108 is more than just a personal journey; it is a compelling exploration of lingering bigotry and biases, made by a woman who is unafraid to share the truth, about both her family and her native country, with a world that needs to know about these kinds of stories."
- Mark Rifkin, This Week in New York, March 18, 2013

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"In Theatres: 108 (CUCHILLO DE PALO)"

"Costa’s starting point is the mysterious death of her uncle, Rodolfo, fifteen years earlier. In the course of making sense of his passing by interviewing her father, Rodolfo’s brother, and friends and neighbors, Costa learns of the aspects of his life that were not discussed by her family, and, in fact, were indicative of a larger societal elision. Rodolfo had an alter ego, a secret gay life, under a dictatorship that severely punished such deviations from societal norms."
- Basil Tsiokos, What (Not) to Doc, March 18, 2013

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"Renate Costa Perdomo's quiet documentary about a dictatorship and a dear, dead uncle"

"Ms Costa Perdomo has made a quiet, strange and sad movie [108], in which, when she appears, is usually as a blur or in very soft focus. We hear her asking questions, but she wants the people she is speaking with to register most strongly. They do. What they tell us is anything but reassuring -- about both the past and the present."
- James van Maanen, Trust Movies, March 17, 2013

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"108 (Cuchillo de Palo)"

"108 (Cuchillo de Palo) is never more enchanting than in its opening moments, which use a series of poetically juxtaposed images to establish the tensions that the documentary will dote on—between the collective and the individual, between the traditional and the progressive, and, most fearlessly, between the melancholic and the absurd."
- Joseph Jon Lanthier, Slant, March 16, 2013

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"Now in Theaters: ‘108 (Cuchillo de Palo)’"

"When Rodolfo Costa was found on the floor of his home in Paraguay, he had been dead for days. Though ostensibly jobless, he had mysteriously amassed a small fortune. He also had an alias—Héctor Torres—and a secret life. In her powerful debut feature, which unfolds like a mystery novel, director Renate Costa Perdomo investigates the shadowy circumstances of Rodolfo’s death. Witnesses and clues gradually reveal Rodolfo’s true identity as a persecuted gay man amidst the terrifying “108” homosexual blacklists that ruined lives, careers, and families."
- Vanessa Erazo, Remezcla, March 15, 2013

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"Film Review: 108 (Cuchillo de Palo)"

"Costa Perdomo films this ultimate encounter between father and daughter in an excruciatingly long, yet supremely telling, silent sequence that is incredibly fraught. (You almost want to scream, “Tell him the truth!”) The sequence stands out as the most histrionically loaded in an gentle documentary that manages to be highly political without ever once veering into tiresome or abrasive preachiness.For all of the oppressive horror it reveals, the film is nevertheless quite lovely, in its methodical peeling away of the camouflage that clouded so many gay lives in the past."
- David Noh, Film Journal International, March 14, 2013

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"Tall Tales, Foreign Fables and a Siren of the '70s"

"A story at once deeply personal and reflective of a national shame...[108] explores the double life and mysterious death of her uncle, Rodolfo Costa, who lay dead on the floor of his apartment for four days before his body was discovered. Only a child at the time, Ms. Perdomo unravels her family's history as it dovetails with the repressive blacklists that targeted homosexuals under the regime of Alfredo Stroessner, the country's dictator from 1954 to 1989. As an adult, the director moved to Spain, returning to Paraguay to make a film that also becomes an investigation of her father's role in the family tragedy—a complex twist that deepens the story's impact."
- Steve Dollar, Wall Street Journal, March 14, 2013

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"108 (Cuchillo de Palo): Bold Rule-Breaking"

"Midway through the unhurried documentary 108 (Cuchillo de Palo), Renate Costa Perdomo, who writes and directs, asks her father Pedro, her chief interview subject, "Don't you wonder what I'm doing?" Costa is investigating the mysterious death, years earlier, of his brother Rodolfo, and many of her interviewees—Rodolfo's friends and neighbors, as well as former Asunción, Paraguay, scenesters—display complete unselfconsciousness in their relationship with the camera, going about their lives even as Costa is filming them when they're late for church or before they wake up. Pedro, speaking for many of them, responds, "I don't usually ask myself.""
- Lily Janiak, The Village Voice, March 13, 2013

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"Documentaries Opening Theatrically in March, 2013"

"Paraguayan filmmaker Renate Costa Perdomo's first feature [108 (Cuchillo de Palo)] is a personal investigation of the death of her uncle, Rudolfo Costa, whose naked body was discovered on the floor of his home, The circumstances of his death were shrouded in mystery."
- Jennifer Merin, About.com, March 1, 2013

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"OSCAR BUZZ: DETROPIA"

"Nominated for an Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature, Detropia is screening February 15 & 16 as part of the Maysles Institute series “Oscar Buzz,” with the Saturday show followed by a Q&A with Grady and Ewing; the series culminates with a free Oscar viewing party on February 24 that includes unlimited organic popcorn."
- Mark Rifkin, This Week In New York, February 14, 2013

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"No More Stigma: The Other City "

"In honor of African American HIV Awareness Day, The Other City will be having a special screening at the Maysles Institute on February 7 as part of the Get Down Campaign’s No More Stigma Film Series, a self-described “bi-monthly series on sex, sexual identity, and sexual health awareness” curated by Kim J. Ford; there will be a cocktail reception at 6:30 hosted by Richard E. Pellzer II and Ulysses Williams, followed by the film at 7:30."
- Mark Rifkin, This Week In New York February 7, 2013

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"Oscar Buzz: This Is Not A Film"

"Although facing a six-year prison sentence and twenty-year ban on making or writing any kind of movie, Panahi is a born storyteller, so he can’t stop himself, no matter the risks."
- Mark Rifkin, This Week In New York, January 29, 2013

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"New York Screenings: Downtown 'Koch,' Uptown Jafar Panahi"

"take the A Train to Harlem for the Maysles Cinema screenings on January 30 and 31 of Jafar Panahi's brilliant and brave autobiographical documentary This Is Not A Film, shot within confines of the Tehran apartment where he has been under house arrest"
- Jennifer Merin, About.com, January 27, 2013

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"Oscar Buzz: How to Survive a Plague, and the History of Sex Workers with ACT UP"

"The movie tells the story of the activism by ACT UP in the 1980s and 1990s to get research developing treatments for HIV on the federal agenda. How to Survive a Plague reminds the viewer that even as the President referred to Stonewall in his inauguration speech last week, it was once acceptable for religious leader Pat Buchanan to use the threat of the virus to tell gay people to be celibate. "
- Melissa Ditmore, POZ, January 25, 2013

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"Oscar Buzz- Ai Wei Wei: Never Sorry"

"Ai gives director, producer, and cinematographer Klayman, making her first full-length film, remarkable access to his personal and professional life as he gets physically abused by Chinese police, prepares to open major exhibits in Munich and London, and visits with his young son, Ai Lao, the result of a tryst with Wang Fen, an editor on his underground films."
- This Week In New York, January 20, 2013

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"The Loving Story at Maysles Cinema "

"This Oscar-shortlisted film is the definitive account of the landmark 1967 Supreme Court decision that legalized interracial marriage: Loving v. Virginia. Married in Washington, D.C. on June 2, 1958, Richard Loving and Mildred Jeter returned home to Virginia where their marriage was declared illegal. "
- Harlem + Bespoke, December 10, 2012

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"Review - 'The Loving Story' (A Uniquely Personal, Poignant Reminder Of The USA's Racist Past)"

"Wisely, the filmmaker stays completely out of the picture, allowing the abundance of archival footage to tell the story, resulting in what we could call a verite-style documentary. And it's thanks to the wonderful black and white civil rights era footage (some never seen publicly before - primarily centered on the couple’s interpersonal relationship, really contrasting the absurdity of anti-miscegenation laws), plus photographs and interviews, that makes Buirski's documentary a deeply-felt, compelling human portrait of this seemingly average, yet remarkable couple - especially when framed in the context of the turbulent era during which their story takes place."
- Courtney, Shadow and Act, December 14, 2012

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"USA Theatrical Premiere Of 'The Loving Story' - December 10-16, 2012, At Maysles NYC"

"The HBO co-production, which toured the film festival circuit over the last year, debuted on HBO in February 2012; and is now getting a limited US theatrical run in New York City, at Maysles Cinema, from December 10-16, 2012."
- Tambay A. Obenson, Shadow & Act, December 12, 2012

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"'The Loving Story': Why Laws Change"

"The Loving Story's archival images grant the documentary an unusual sort of intimacy, even as it recalls a remarkable historical event."
- Cynthia Fuchs, PopMatters, December 10, 2012

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"Director Nancy Buirski on The Loving Story"

"...when the footage surfaced, I realized how beautiful it was and how, like all cinéma vérité, it makes us feel like we’re right there with the subjects and it immerses us in that time and place. Though this vérité was shot 44 years earlier, it really did put us back in time. So I realized immediately what I could do, which is to create a much more narrative approach to this story and thread the footage through it as though we were living through it with the Lovings. "
- Esther Yi, Filmmaker Magazine, December 11, 2012

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"The top 10 movie picks for the week of Dec. 9, 2012"

"10. “The Loving Story” (mayslesinstitute.org) You’ll find this Oscar hopeful, about the fight to legalize interracial marriage, at the Maysles Institute all week."
- Elizabeth Weitzman, NY Daily News, December 9, 2012

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"DOCUMENTARY IN BLOOM: THE LOVING STORY"

"One of the many fascinating aspects of the film is that Richard and Mildred had no desire to be trailblazers fighting miscegenation laws; they were just a man and a woman who had fallen in love at first sight and wanted to live happily ever after, in a community that fully accepted their situation. They of course have the perfect last name, because The Loving Story is a story of love and romance as much as it is about an outdated legal system, bigotry, and white supremacy. And it is more relevant than ever, with the issue of same-sex marriage dividing much of the nation. "
- Mark Rifkin, twi-ny, December 10, 2012

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"In Theatres: THE LOVING STORY"

"Coming to NYC’s Maysles Cinema for a one-week theatrical run starting this Monday, December 10: THE LOVING STORY. Nancy Buirski’s exploration of the Supreme Court case that legalized interracial marriage premiered at last year’s Tribeca. Its festival circuit included Full Frame, Silverdocs, Hamptons, and Traverse City, among others."
- Basil Tsiokos, what (not) to doc, December 7, 2012

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"In THE LOVING STORY, Nancy Buirski gives us the real Mildred and Richard -- and more"

"This is amazing, rarely-seen movie-making, partly, of course, due to the historic footage that was available. But Buirski and her team have whipped it all together quite well. The film begins with a man's voice explaining why interracial marriage goes against god's plan. These are, of course, stupid words, the presumption in which is rather staggering, even back in 1958. When we later learn who spoke them -- and how, by doing so, he actually helped the Lovings' case -- the effect is bracing indeed."
- James van Maanen, TrustMovies, December 8, 2012

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"Review: ‘The Loving Story’ is Necessary History Strengthened By Extraordinary Footage "

"Buirski counters the chance of their [Mildred and Richard Loving] remaining mere names in the history and law books by filling her documentary with an extraordinary amount of real-time material of the subjects courtesy of never-before-seen verite film shot from 1965 on by Hope Ryden, one of the direct cinema pioneers (she was then a member of Drew Associates, along with such legends as Robert Drew, D.A. Pennebaker, Ricky Leacock, James Lipscomb and Albert Maysles), and cinematographer Abbot Mills...Like two other new docs from this year, David France’s How to Survive a Plague and Shola Lynch’s Free Angela Davis and All Political Prisoners, The Loving Story fits into a subgenre that Lynch has coined “historical verite,” films which immerse us in a time through extensive in-the-moment archive material and focused, first-hand storytelling from select interviewees."
- Christopher Campbell , Film School Rejects, December 9, 2012

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"The Loving Story"

"A moving, must-see documentary about the Lovings’ belated vindication and the elimination of one of the last vestiges of segregation."
- Kam Williams, Blacknj, December, 2012

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"The Loving Story (limited release) "

"Filmmaker Nancy Buirski's The Loving Story sheds light on America's turbulent Civil Rights era by focusing on the case of Mildred and Richard Loving, an interracial couple whose love and commitment to each other gave them the strength and courage to challenge separatist laws and, with the help of two young lawyers, win the landmark Supreme Court decision that banned prohibition of interracial marriage, and changed the course of America's social and political history."
- Jennifer Merin, About.com, December, 2012

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"The Loving Story"

"The perfect place for The Loving Story to make its U.S. theatrical premiere is at The Maysles Cinema,' states Program Director Jessica Green. 'The history of race equality and marriage equality is ideally explored and discussed in one of the most diverse and politically engaged neighborhoods in the world, at a serious all-documentary cinema with an audience like no other."
- Jessica Green interviewed by Wilson Morales, Blackfilm.com, December 3, 2012

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"The Loving Story"

"Deeply touching look at the interracial couple whose 1958 marriage led to their being arrested in Virginia, and, a decade later, to the overturning of the state’s miscegenation law."
- New York, December 2012

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"The Loving Story "

"Perhaps the strongest aspect of the doc is that it allows the Lovings to tell their story in their own words. The Lovings weren't leaders in the movement, they didn't march alongside the likes of Martin Luther King Jr. or Medgar Evers. But it's there ordinariness, so honestly displayed in the film, that makes their place in history all the more poignant."
- Zeba Blay, Slant Magazine, December 9, 2012

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"The Loving Story "

"Well-timed and well crafted in equal measures, The Loving Story is a thoughtful, terrifically intimate account of the case that dismantled this country's anti-miscegenation laws 100 years after the abolition of slavery...[it] complement[s] Lincoln's warm, wonky embrace of the democratic procedural."
- Michelle Orange, The Village Voice, December 5, 2012

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"THE LOVING STORY"

"Nancy Buirski directed this documentary, about Richard and Mildred Loving, the couple who sparked the 1967 Supreme Court decision that legalized interracial marriage in the U.S. Opening Dec. 10. (Maysles Cinema)"
- The New Yorker, December 10, 2012

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"Interview with Nancy Buirski - Director of The Loving Story"

" I wanted to develop a narrative approach that would connect us to the Lovings as flesh and blood human beings. Though they were heroes, they were still people, not symbols. It was important that viewers understood on a very human level what Mildred and Richard were going through. Empathy is ultimately the greatest tool a filmmaker has – fiction or non-fiction. "
- Melissa Silverstein, Indiewire, December 7, 2012

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"Film Review: The Loving Story"

"Using abundant, amazingly fresh, newly discovered film footage...Buirski creates a compelling, deeply human and context-savvy portrait of this seemingly most ordinary, yet extraordinary, of couples."
- David Noh, FilmJournal, Dec 6, 2012

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"Shadow & Act-Sponsored Screening Of 'Central Park Five' At Maysles Cinema, w/ Q-and-A "

"If you haven't yet seen the critically-acclaimed feature documentary, The Central Park Five ... and it's on your to-see list (it really should be if it's not), consider attending tomorrow night's screening, at Maysles Cinema in Harlem."
- Tambay A. Obenson, Shadow And Act, Nov. 26, 2012

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"A Legal Case Out of Control: 'The Central Park Five'"

"The Central Park Five offers a sober, poignant, and utterly horrifying recollection of a legal case out of control, a case as “wild” as any fantastical charges made against the kids—all living in Harlem, black and Latino, between 14 and 16 years old when they were arrested—who went to prison for a crime they didn’t commit."
- Cynthia Fuchs, PopMatters, Nov. 21, 2012

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"Cleared in the Rape of a Central Park Jogger, but Still Calculating the Cost"

"The film lays out the intricacies of the case, the sights and sounds of a brittle era; it will be full of revelations for those who never knew about the crime and how its life-bending effects were multiplied as the wrong people were prosecuted while the right man continued to maim, murder and rape on the Upper East Side."
- Jim Dwyer, New York Times, Nov. 20, 2012

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"The Central Park Five; The Loving Story"

"an unprecedented opportunity to see two uniquely hard-hitting documentaries on race relations in the U.S. at Maysles Cinema in Harlem, one of the crown jewels of the nation’s most famous Black neighborhood..."
- Louis Proyect, Louis Proyect: The Unrepentant Marxist, Nov. 23, 2012

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"'Central Park Five' Subjects Call on Tastemakers to 'Right This Wrong!'"

"Legendary filmmaker Albert Maysles says... 'I want to congratulate all of the filmmakers involved with this film. I would say that it complies with every single thing that makes for a good documentary, and it's going to make for a better world.'"
- Scott Feinberg, Hollywood Reporter, Oct. 28, 2012

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"When Mass Hysteria Convicted 5 Teenagers"

"...a matter-of-fact but profoundly disturbing depiction of the forces that led citizens, politicians, the media and the criminal justice system to brush past yawning gaps in the evidence in the case. The five teenagers, aged 14 to 16, were convicted — based on confessions they say were coerced — in what former Mayor Ed Koch describes in the film as “the crime of the century.” ... Looking back at their younger selves, the men speak of loss and of standing at a kind of remove from the lives they are trying to live. As Mr. Wise, who served 13 years, puts it: “You can forgive but you won’t forget. You won’t forget what you done lost. No money could bring that time back. No money could bring the life that was missing or the time that was taken away.”"
- Brent Staples, New York Times, Oct. 27, 2012

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"Ken Burns Refuses to Hand Over 'Central Park Five' Research to City"

"...the filmmakers, including Ken Burns, Sarah Burns and David McMahon, are objecting to the city's demands, saying that officials were given opportunites to participate in the making of the film and, after denying interview requests, are now on a fishing expedition. In a motion to quash subpoenas filed late last week, Florentine Films cites reporter's privilege and says the city hasn't articulated a good reason why it needs footage."
- Eriq Gardner, Hollywood Reporter, Nov. 12, 2012

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"The Ken Burns Effect"

"NYC is trying to obtain footage shot by Ken Burns for his upcoming film about the Central Park Five. Should documentarians be protected by shield laws like journalists?"
- Jacob Soboroff, HuffPostLive, Nov. 2, 2012

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"Compelling Reason for Following Father’s Footsteps Sarah Burns and the Documentary ‘Central Park Five’"

"'Part of our goal is simply to inform people about what happened in this case. But we also want people to think about how this happened. That means talking about false confessions, about the failure of all the institutions in the city to protect these kids, and particularly how the media failed to apply any journalistic skepticism to the story the police gave them. And of course the underlying prejudice that made it all too easy for so many to believe that these kids were guilty.'"
- Felicia R. Lee, New York Times Nov. 15, 2012

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"The Central Park Five Talk To S&A About Their Film, Civil Suit, Their Lives Today"

"The Central Park Five is an informative, infuriating affirmation of America's racial animus... a fine piece of heightened documentary reporting, simply presents the facts, and does so exhaustively, despite what seem like attempts by the City Of New York to contest them, or at least to use them to help them defend against the pending $50 million federal lawsuit filed by the defendents (the Central Park Five - Yusef Salaam, Kevin Richardson, Antron McCray, Raymond Santana and Korey Wise) 9 years ago."
- Tambay A. Obenson, Shadow and Act, Nov. 14, 2012

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"USA Theatrical Premiere Of 'The Loving Story' (On Case That Overturned Interracial Marriage Ban)"

"Persecuted by a local sheriff, the Lovings were found guilty of violating Virginia's law against interracial marriage and forced to leave the state. But Mildred Loving chose to fight. She wrote a letter to Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy asking for help. He referred her to the ACLU and two young attorneys took the case. Drawing on extensive archival footage, and on contemporary interviews with the family and the attorneys, the film vividly brings a monumental court case to life. The film was shortlisted for the Best Documentary Feature Oscar."
- TAMBAY A. OBENSON, Shadow and Act, Nov. 6, 2012

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"In Theatres: IN MY MOTHER’S ARMS "

"The film presents the orphanage in an appropriately raw and gritty light, allowing the viewer to become immersed in the children’s experiences, and generating undeniable empathy for Husham. Still, his task is decidedly Sisyphean"
- Basil Tsiokos, What (not) to Doc, Oct. 5, 2012

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"DOCUMENTARY IN BLOOM: IN MY MOTHER’S ARMS"

"Sibling filmmakers Atia and Mohamed Jabarah Al-Daradji... include no talking heads or so-called experts examining the situation and don’t pull at the heartstrings by manipulating emotions, instead telling the story like a mini-thriller as Husham tries every avenue possible to help preserve a better future for the children under his care."
- Mark Rifkin, This Week in New York, Oct. 8, 2012

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"Little Lives Caught in a Troubled No Man’s Land"

"“In My Mother’s Arms” takes a distressing snapshot of an ongoing struggle. Despondent but resolute, Mr. Al Thabe says little, refusing to be goaded by the wife who chides him for neglecting his own family. But as he tirelessly fans his sleeping charges, his worried expression tells us everything we may not want to know."
- Jeannette Catsoulis, New York Times, Oct. 8, 2012

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"Maysles Cinema Introduces Monthly Film Series Exploring Integral Elements Of Hip Hop Culture & Influence"

"Tomorrow night, August 10th, starting at 7:30pm... titled The 5th Element?, Maysles Cinema here in NYC introduces a monthly film series exploring the integral elements of hip hop's culture and influence beyond the traditional four: the MC, DJ, Bboying, and Graffiti. As it's a monthly series, upcoming topics at future events include: hip hop fashion, the image of the gangsta, activism and hip hop, and hip hop as a collage."
- Tambay A. Obenson, Shadow and Act - Indiewire, August 9, 2012

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"Box Office Preview"

"Macarena Aguiló's doc The Chilean Building (Magic Lantern) tells the story of sixty children from Chile who were raised in Europe and Cuba as a part of "Project Home," a group of adults who hoped to protect them as their parents fought the war against dictator Pinochet.""
- Ed Douglas, Comingsoon.net, August 14, 2012

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"The Chilean Building: Film Review"

"The doc's most poignant moments come late, as parents -- both those who entrusted their biological children to others, and those who took them in -- speak of the hard decisions they made and their (largely foreseeable) consequences."
- John DeFore, The Hollywood Reporter, August 14, 2012

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"The Chilean Building (El Edificio de Los Chilenos) - Movie Review"

"For filmmaker Macarena Aguilo, The Chilean Building is both an exploration of a fascinating chapter in the history of Chile, the country of her birth, and a foray into her own background and personal experiences with the leftist social and political experiment that influenced her childhood and her long range outlook."
- Jennifer Merin, About.com, August 11, 2012

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"Pinochet's Disappeared Children: 'The Chilean Building'"

"As she recounts in her superb documentary, the Project House accommodated some 60 children, all assigned to "social families." These were headed by about 20 adults serving the rebellion as foster parents while their counterparts remained in Chile, fighting, being imprisoned and tortured, being killed."
- Cynthia Fuchs, Pop Matters, August 14, 2012

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" The Chilean Building "

"'The Chilean Building" is a gripping drama that like so much of the time today surpasses narrative films both in its believability as well as its intensity. I would also strongly urge my readers to make a point of seeing it for no other reason that is an excuse to see a new and revitalized Harlem. The theater is at 343 Lenox Avenue/Malcolm X Boulevard between 127th and 128th Streets, just a stone's throw away from a Senegalese/Continental fusion restaurant called Les Ambassades Bar & Restaurant that I spent a pleasant evening at just before retiring from Columbia University."
- Louis Proyect, Louis Proyect: The Unrepentant Marxist, August 13, 2012

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"LatinoBuzz: The Chilean Building, a Personal Doc on Chile's Untold History, Screens in NY"

"It has toured the world playing film festivals and winning awards, including the prize for Best Documentary at the 2011 New York International Latino Film Festival. It's a personal and touching look at a unique moment in Chile's political history that many people--including Chileans themselves--don't know about."
- Vanessa Erazo, Indiewire, August 12, 2012

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" Film Review: The Chilean Building"

"Macarena Aguiló's melancholy documentary about her childhood spent in group safe homes with other children of Chilean revolutionaries is like some home movie for the generation who thought they could change not just the government, but the very idea of family itself."
- Chris Barsanti, Film Journal, Aug 10, 2012

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"What's Showing Today? Monday, August 13"

"The decision to leave the children was made out of concern for their safety, as even Aguiló herself was kidnapped as a child by the Pinochet regime in order to root out her parents. And per critics' reviews, the documentary revisits the students as adults to learn that apparently all regard their parents' decisions as necessary and honorable. "
Screenslate.com, Aug. 10, 2012

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"Film Review"

"The Chilean Building is an extremely personal documentary examining a group of Chilean dissidents' decision to return to their country in the late 70s after after being exiled to Paris during the oppressive rule of dictator Augusto Pinochet. Deemed too dangerous for their young children to accompany them, they made the difficult decision to leave them behind with a selection of adults — not necessarily the ones who were their parents."
- Alex Peterson, Tiny Mix Tapes, August 10, 2012

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"Macarena Aguiló's 'THE CHILEAN BUILDING' probes Pinochet's Chile from a new angle"

"What this movie finally gets at, and about as strongly and precisely as I have seen, is the price we all must finally pay for past actions. As another young woman explains it, "What these families are experiencing is the need not to risk damaging all that they have built up -- their life, which is dangling by a very narrow thread -- by talking about the past." And yet, as the filmmaker and her documentary tell us at the close: "Emptiness is a path that is only filled when you walk it.""
- James van Maanen, TrustMovies, August 10, 2012

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"A Conversation with Livia Bloom and Macarena Aguiló, director of The Chilean Building"

"In this documentary, director Macarena Aguiló, herself a product of Project Home, provides an intimate, behind-the-scenes examination of a grand and surprising social and political experiment."
- Livia Bloom, Women and Hollywood - Indiewire, August 10, 2012

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"Seven Summer Films You Really Shouldn't Miss"

"Opening Aug. 13, Macarena Aguilo's autobiographical 'The Chilean Building' is a fascinating historical account of how political activists opposing the brutal dictator Augusto Pinochet protected their children by creating 'Project Home.'"
- Jennifer Merin, Women's E-News, August 1, 2012

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"'The Chilean Building'"

"Macarena Aguiló’s fascinating first-person documentary chronicles the fate of broken leftist families during Pinochet’s reign."
- Eric Hynes, The Village Voice, August 9, 2012

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"In Theaters: 'The Chilean Building'"

"Aguiló, her surrogate siblings, and both social and biological parents reflect on their history together through animation, archival photos and diaries, and emotional interviews, presenting an intimate and engaging personal history that is broadened by shared experiences and circumstances to transcend the individual and instead represent a nation’s difficult history in microcosm."
- Basil Tsiokos, What (Not) to Doc, August 9, 2012

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"'All Me: The Life and Times of Winfred Rembert' at Maysles Cinema 11 July"

"The film—which screens at Maysles Cinema on 11 July, followed by a Q&A with Rembert and director Vivian Ducat and—traces how he has survived, by telling his stories in his art. At once harrowing and heartening, these stories are represented in particularly vivid form: Rembert's paintings are actually not made with paint, but with bright dyes he applies to leather canvases."
- Cynthia Fuchs, Pop Matters, July 11, 2012

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"Ballin' With Street Cred: The New Documentary About NYC Street Basketball"

"Filmmaker Bobbito Garcia tells us about his new film "Doin' It In The Park". This independent production is the only film supported by the New York Knicks basketball team."
- NBC New York, June 11, 2012

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"'I Got Next': Exploring New York Through Pickup Basketball"

"This impromptu adventure did not thrill my parents, but, I figured, what better way to explore the spirit of one of the Western world's most condensed cities than through sports, the great assimilator? I am convinced that some of the city's truths, if not all of them, are boiled down on its basketball blacktops"
- Isaac Eger, New York Times, July 11, 2012

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"Ballplayer: Pelotero: Film Review"

"what starts out as an inspirational tale of two young hopefuls quickly becomes a backstage drama in which both of their potentially budding baseball careers become mired in controversy."
- Frank Scheck, The Hollywood Reporter, July 13, 2012

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"Ballplayer: Pelotero"

""What drives me is that we want to tell stories set in the world of sports but have a general appeal to an audience," Muscato told Deadline."
- Brian Brooks, Deadline.com, July 13, 2012

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"'Ballplayer: Pelotero' Ruffles MLB Feathers, Looks at Corrupt Dominican Baseball Recruiting"

"The film was directed by Guagua Productions' Ross Finkel, Trevor Martin, and Jon Paley, who released a statement saying, ""It is frustrating to hear Commissioner Selig state that our film is inaccurate. We stand by what we documented in 'Ballplayer: Pelotero' and would welcome the opportunity to showcase the documentary to Mr. Selig so he can specifically address what he feels is inaccurate.""
Hispanically Speaking News, July 12, 2012

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"In Theaters"

"I want to spotlight another interesting doc hitting theaters this weekend: Ballplayer: Pelotero. It's a film that Major League Baseball isn't too happy aboutbecause it's about the Dominican Republic's exportation of kids to America's ballfields and presents a scathing viewpoint on the system and alleged corruption of team owners who are able to lower a valuable player's price tag."
- Christopher Campbell, Movies.com, July 13, 2012

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"Film Journal Film Review"

"Unexpectedly, this viewer was forced to rethink assumptions about objectification. Victimization is the wrong word here, for these guys know the terms when they go in: They want to play, they want the rewards, they know the score. But when you see Sanó's distended shoulder in an effectively shot close-up, it drives home the fact that even if the players make it to the big leagues, with a lucrative contract, there is still a big price to be paid. For this reason alone, women should see the film; use of body parts is not gender-exclusive after all. "
- Marsha McCreadie, Film Journal, July 13, 2012

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"NY Post Movie Review BALLPLAYER: PELOTEROe"

"That's one of the revelations in "Ballplayer: Pelotero," a documentary narrated by John Leguizamo that provides a seldom-seen look inside the training camps run by MLB in that impoverished nation."
- V.A. Musetto, NY Post, July 13, 2012

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"Baseball Dreams and Schemes"

"The resulting scheming — is either player lying about his age? are the teams colluding to avoid a bidding war? — is dismaying, to say the least. Commendably, the film, narrated by John Leguizamo, sugarcoats nothing, and the people involved — the players, their trainers, their parents, the scouts — are remarkably forthright. We're so used to hearing innocuous clichés come out of the mouths of major leaguers in postgame interviews that the accusations and innuendo in this film are startling."
- Neil Genzlinger, New York Times, July 12, 2012

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"AV Club Review"

"Like other major industries, baseball is taking advantage of outsourcing, and in the process has created a cutthroat environment where the potential for significant dollar figures has led to deception, corruption, and ruthless competition."
- Alison Willmore, The Onion's AV Club, July 12, 2012

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"Dorfman: Veil lifted on Dominican pipeline"

"That's the way it is today, much improved but still exploited to some extent by nasty people standing between the young Dominican prospect and the big leagues. When the three directors returned a year later, they said they expected to find a "Wild West of Baseball." They discovered, instead, a highly nuanced system, struggling with its own identity. The Dominican system, they now report, is one of stark contradictions. "
- Sid Dorfman, NJ Star-Ledger, July 10, 2012

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"Inside the secret world of Dominican baseball "

"Of course, as this fascinating film makes clear, there's no way to separate the intense Dominican national passion for baseball from its social, cultural and economic context. While "Ballplayer" is certainly unsettling, must-see viewing for baseball fans — a nonfiction follow-up to Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck's outstanding 2009 feature "Sugar" — it's a vibrant tale, alive with color and texture, that's far more than a sports movie. "
- Andrew O'Hehir, Salon.com, July 10, 2012

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"Slant Magazine Review"

"The filmmakers, understanding that the subject matter speaks for itself, assume you'll intuitively grasp the contrast between the beautiful images of Sanó and Batista playing ball and the cheap, boring theatrics of the older men looking to get what they want for a desirable price. The doc is a sly, interesting achievement: It opens as an entertaining sports story and closes as a metaphor for government corruption. "
- Chuck Bowen, Slant Magazine, July 11, 2012

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"Time Out Review"

"10 percent of MLB players are now DR-born—corruption comes from every angle: Impoverished kids like Batista routinely lie about their age to increase their value, while scouts stoop to slanderous aspersions to drive prices down."
- Eric Hynes, Time Out New York, July 11, 2012

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"Ballplayer: Pelotero"

"An unexpectedly gripping portrait of how MLB's sausage gets made, the film pits the frustration of the young players and their families, who see baseball as a way out of poverty, against the inflexibility of MLB, which battles age and identity fraud among players—and which declined to be interviewed for the film."
- Michael Leaverton, The Village Voice, July 11, 2012

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" The Weekend Warrior"

"The film does a good job showing how much pressure is put on these young men and their families leading up to the July 2 decision day and how the money they can make playing baseball can get them out of poverty and fulfill all their dreams."
- Ed Douglas, Comingsoon.net, July 10, 2012

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"New In Theaters This Week: 'Ballplayer: Pelotero' (Exposé On MLB Training Camps In Dominican Republic)"

"While riveting to watch, as the mystery surrounding each young player's (or pelotero's) Major League Baseball prospects are, it's actually quite sad and even enraging to watch what plays out like a form of modern day slavery, as this peloteros are essentially treated like merchandise - product to be bought and sold, without having much of a say (given their age and psychological development) as to what path their lives will take; all the adults around them - from their local trainers (some of them becoming ersatz fathers to these young men, teaching them not only about the game but about life), to the MLB scouts, the MLB itself (a monopoly referred to as a "mafia" by a family member of one of the 2 star prospects followed in this film), to (unfortunately) even their family members."
- Tambay A. Obenson, Indiewire's Shadow and Act, July 10, 2012

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"Hitting For Dollars"

"We had a romantic image of these players humble beginnings etched in our minds; poor kids chasing rolled up socks through dusty streets as motorbikes whizzed by. However, that vision of street ball felt disconnected to another romantic idea of Dominican baseball; Big Papi, Sammy Sosa, or Robinson Cano slowly trotting around the bases under the bright lights and cheering fans of a big league ballpark. How does one lead to the other? And what is the story in between the two?"
- Danny Perry, BrinkZINE, July, 2012

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"Ballplayer: Pelotero"

"This documentary look at two Dominican teens vying for baseball glory in the U.S. leagues starts off as a human-interest story about big dreams and winds up being a surprisingly cutting exposé of backstabbing and duplicity."
- New York Magazine July, 2012

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"Story of Miguel Sano chronicles ugly, sleazy side of baseball's Dominican Republic talent pipeline"

"The truth doesn't exist here. The Dominican Republic is a web and wasteland of hustlers and pimps, moneymakers and moneytakers. It is a place where age and identity are transient, where pre-teens get shot with steroids, where the privileged have preyed on the poor, where an alleged child molester trained teenage boys for more than 20 years, where a baseball subculture has grown out of a shadow economy and into a cash crop. "
- Jeff Pason, Yahoo Sports, Jul 2, 2012

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"Bobby V. backs controversial documentary"

"It's not anyone acting. It's just the way things are done," Valentine, the former Mets manager, told The Post in a telephone interview. "It might seem foreign to some people watching it here. I'm sure it's been the way things are done for years to get the upper hand."
- Ken Davidoff, NY Post, July 2, 2012

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"Documentaries Opening in July, 2012"

"The film shows the hopes, anxieties, moments of disappointment and those of triumph, the players train and prepare for their big day and go through negotiations. While revealing these players' particular stories, the filmmakers question why the people of the Dominican Republic are so obsessed with baseball, and why such a small country with a relatively small population can produce some 20 percent of professional baseball players under contract to U.S. major league teams."
- Jennifer Merin, About.com, July, 2012

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"Johnathan Paley, "BALLPLAYER: PELOTERO""

"Well, we always set out to make a feature; what we didn't know was that it was going to turn into the expose it did."
- Brandon Harris, Filmmaker Magazine, June 28, 2012

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"Tahrir: Liberation Square: The Revolution of the Kids of KFC Through the Eyes of Stefano Savona "

"There have been at least a half dozen films on Tahrir since the now historic events of 2011, including one titled 18 Days comprised of ten narrative shorts by a group of Egyptian filmmakers, one on four youths shown going Back to the Square a year later, and one on the day to day events of the Revolution as seen through the eyes of a popular blogger titled Words of Witness. Yet Savona's film stands out, in its simplicity but also through its familiarity. It is perhaps because of his own unfaltering admiration for the place and its people."
- Nina Roethe, Huffington Post, June 29, 2012

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"TAHRIR: LIBERATION SQUARE review by Gerald Wright "

"Not knowing what would be said by the protesters and not knowing what would happen at any given point, this film turns out to be a documentary at its best. Highlighting the enthusiasm, fear and anguish as it occurs is remarkable.e"
- Gerald Wright, Film Showcase, June 11, 2012

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"Indiewire's The Playlist Interview"

"I didn't really have the time to prepare for this one because I decided to leave the following day, but of course all of the films I saw in the previous years had influenced me. When I was in the square, the very first movie that came to mind was the Maysles "Gimme Shelter.""
- Christopher Bell, Indiewire, June 12, 2012

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"In Theatres: TAHRIR: LIBERATION SQUARE"

"'Savona’s camera documents not only citizens gathered on the precipice of change, but also a complex swirl of emotions from a people finally able to speak out publicly and communally against a thirty-year-long regime - their fear, anticipation, confusion, anger, and, most importantly, hope, determination, and joy shine through.'"
- Basil Tsiokos, What (not) to Doc, Jyne 8, 2012

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"Children of the Revolution"

"‘A woman in a burgundy headscarf teaches a young girl to chant, “The people want the fall of the president” in the middle of Tahrir Square. A frantic girl refuses to leave the streets, afraid that her leader will return even after he has stepped down. She screams, “They want to shut us up,” upon hearing that the constitution has been suspended. A man in a sea of protesters writes on a piece of cardboard, “Mubarak is killer.” Men tie makeshift helmets to their heads as stones fall like rain from the sky.’"
- Sandra Larriva, Cinespect, June 8, 2012

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"Tahrir: Liberation Square: Film Review"

"the film features impassioned comments and discussions from a wide variety of ordinary Egyptians about their methods and objectives. The editing by Penelope Bortoluzzi is particularly effective at capturing the quicksilver changes of emotion—from jubilation to anger to despair to hopefulness—that were felt by the participants."
- Frank Scheck , The Hollywood Reporter, June 6, 2012

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"Finding Freedom on Film"

"The run-and-gun camerawork trades polish for vital immediacy, capturing the daily confessions, debates and exhilarated outbursts of anger and celebration by a core of protesters who every day brave violence and doubt to see their cause to the end. It's an inspiring document of history in the making."
- Steve Dollar, Wall Street Journal, June 7 2012

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"Tahrir: Liberation Square Review"

"The Middle Eastern nation’s uprising had been going at full steam for nearly four days at the time of Savona’s arrival, which was long enough to inundate Cairo’s Tahrir Square with demonstrators: tens, perhaps hundreds of thousands of cheering, chanting, marching, debating, voice-losing, gleeful Egyptian citizens who realized seemingly en masse the narcotic power of open political discourse. Tahrir, of course, is where Savona ended up."
- Robert Hershorn, Tiny Mix Tapes, June 7 2012

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"Review: 'Tahrir' Is A Must-See Account Of The Egyptian Uprising"

""Tahrir" succeeds in being a perfect of-the-moment time capsule, transporting the viewer right into the middle of the scuffle. In fact, Savona's camera is so involved in the demonstrations that it often feels like an individual that's part of them rather than just watching them"
- Christopher Bell, Indiewire, June 11, 2012

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"Film Journal Review Tahrir: Liberation Square"

"Stirringly in-your-face documentary about the Arab Spring revolution is a priceless historical, human document."
- David Noh, Film Journal, June 11, 2012

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"Documentary in Bloom - Tahrir"

"As hundreds of thousands of Egyptians flooded the area, singing, protesting, and demanding that President Hosni Mubarak step down, Savano followed around various individuals and groups, including Elsayed, Noha, and Ahmed, getting them to share their thoughts on revolution and change, capturing intimate moments of their fight for freedom."
- This Week in New York, June 11, 2012

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"Tahrir: Liberation square"

"“Tahrir: Liberation Square” is a breathtaking and politically engaged documentary that opens tomorrow at The Maysles Theater in Harlem for a one week run. Anybody with more than a passing interest in the movements challenging the status quo over the past two years, from Wall Street to Tahrir Square, will find it spellbinding"
- Louis Proyect, Louis Proyect: The Unrependant Marxist, June 10, 2012

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"A Revolution Without a Leader: 'Tahrir: Liberation Square'"

"he camera captures the people’s pulsing energies, offering a very different view of the Square than western media were able to show at the time. Where televisions around the world showed pictures of the crowds, the fires, the government’s efforts to police from afar, this film brings you closer. "
- Cynthia Fuchs, Pop Matters, June 11, 2012

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"A Chronicle of Cairo Protests"

"Begun in January 2011 amid mass demonstrations in downtown Cairo, “Tahrir: Liberation Square” had its official premiere scarcely six months later at the Locarno Film Festival in Switzerland. That makes it a hot document as far as movies go, recording events with ramifications yet unknown to Egyptians or the rest of the world. "
- Nicholas Rapold, New York Times, June 10, 2012

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"Docs in Theatres"

"And what he delivers is not only significant to what happened but also to the medium of documentary, as it’s the kind of immediate and present filming that Direct Cinema lives on through while also filling a huge void in journalism today."
- Christopher Campbell, documentary Channel, June 9, 2012

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"Slant Magazine Film Review"

"The you-are-there immediacy carries retroactive echoes, for the American viewer, of the rhythms and rhetoric of the Occupy Wall Street demonstrations that these protests directly inspired months later (chants include "We're the people who have to work," and a lusty English "Go to hell" aimed at Mubarak), but the stakes are deadlier."
- Bill Weber, Slant Magazine, June 9, 2012

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"TAHRIR: LIBERATION SQUARE You are there in Stefano Savona's antidote to the typical media coverage of Eqyptian Spring"

"stays close enough to overhear conversations, arguments, and of course, the slogans and chants that are epidemic at all protests"
- James Van Maneen, Trust Movies, June 9, 2012

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"Tahrir: Liberation Square"

"the impact of seeing such unvarnished public activism in the raw can’t be overestimated."
- David Fear, Time Out, June 11, 2012

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"The Arab Spring and What Comes Next "

"While a young, secular liberal expresses his support for the Muslim Brotherhood, others are more concerned with the direction the country might take should that group seize power. Youthful activists debate the importance of dissolving the constitution, while others simply delight in the diversity of voices joining together for some vague conception of freedom."
- Andrew Schenker, The L Magazine, June 6, 2012

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"Tahrir: Liberation Square: Stefano Savona's Vital, Chaotic Work"

"As documented in Stefano Savona's vital, chaotic Tahrir: Liberation Square, there's no soundtrack to the Egyptian revolution, at least not one provided by careworn '60s anthems or rousing string arrangements. There is rhythm to the revolt, though, and it's established early on, as even a young child chants the refrain emanating from Cairo's Tahrir Square."
- Michelle Orange, The Village Voice, June 6, 2012

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"The whole world is wathcing Tahrir Square on film"

"For many, Egypt's Tahrir Square has become the iconic symbol of the most vivid revolutionary moment in recent history, the so-called "Arab Spring." When hundreds of thousands of demonstrators gathered in Cairo's central meeting place to protest Hosni Mubarak's dictatorial rule, the whole world was watching. But the mainstream news media, as always, showed only a sliver of what happened."
- Anthony Kaufman, Sundance Blog, June 06, 2012

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"Tahrir"

"Using only a small digital camera and sound recorder, director Stefano Savona goes into the streets of Cairo, Egypt, to document the massive protests centered in Tahrir Square that eventually ended the government of President Hosni Mubarak and sparked revolutions throughout the Middle East. Savona, a trained archaeologist, has a keen eye for social detail and, focusing his hand held camera on select protesters, his footage captures the fierce attitude of the crowd and the intense spirit of their determination."
- About.com

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"Interview with Israeli Filmmaker and Scholar Avner Faingulernt"

"Cinespect recently spoke with renowned Israeli filmmaker and scholar Avner Faingulernt who is overseeing a program of new Israeli cinema from Gaza and Sderot at Maysles Cinema from May 1-3. Our Conversation is as follows."
- Ryan Wells, Cinespect, April 30, 2012

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"Serving for Screen Time"

"Spring Pong, the first annual spring benefit for the Maysles Institute in Harlem, took place at SPiN New York on Sunday night. Spring pong? Does that differ significantly than winter or fall pong? Guests Kweli Washington and Andrew Rosen, both in their mid-30s, thought so. "It's got this friskiness," said Mr. Washington. "A little extra pep in your step," said Mr. Rosen."
- Lizzie Simon, Wall Street Journal, April 30, 2012

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"New Israeli Cinema"

""New Israeli Cinema From Gaza To Sderot" presents a new wave of cinema that has emerged in Southern Israel during the last decade. It began in the most unexpected place, in a Gazan war zone on the Sderot border. It began in small immigrants' towns and settlements of people from Arab countries, North Africa, South America and Eastern Europe."
- VideoArt.net, April 28, 2012

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"A look at the real Bob Marley"

"As many of you know, the long awaited documentary on the life of Bob Marley, Marley, premiered last Friday. It's the first in-depth look into Bob's life from his early days to his rise to international stardom, with actual interviews and stories from his family and others who were closest to him. Thanks to director Kevin MacDonald, Bob Marley's fans get to encounter him in a way other than through speakers and headphones, for an insight to his life that no other filmmaker has done before."
- Marcus Samuelson, April 23, 2012

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"Maysles Institute Accepting Applications For Summer Documentary Film Program For Teens"

"I'd say this is a tremendous opportunity for any of you parents out there with teens who'll be home this summer, and are at all interested in cinema. The Maysles Institute - the non-profit organization dedicated to the exhibition and production of inspiring and inciting documentary films, with programs that engage diverse communities - is currently accepting applications for its Summer Documentary Film Program, which is a 6-week course for teen filmmakers."
- Tambay, Indiewire, April 23, 2012

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"Street Views"

"Psychohydrography is a cinematic travelogue along the 51-mile stretch of the Los Angeles River from its origins at the Sierra Nevada to its estuary at Long Beach Harbor. The hour long movie is composed of a string of static frames abstracting the variously natural and man-shaped landscapes into a kind of meditative visual poetry accompanied by a running, abruptly-shifting soundtrack of modified found sounds."
- Screen Slate, April 24, 2012

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"Reggae's Mellow King, Defined by a Legacy He Couldn't Outrun"

"A thorn in the side of the Jamaican reggae superstar Bob Marley was his lack of a black audience in the United States even at the height of his career. But in September 1980, eight months before his death at 36, that began to change with a triumphant engagement at Madison Square Garden, where he and his band, the Wailers, opened for the Commodores. The next day, according to "Marley," a riveting two-and-a-half-hour documentary biography directed by Kevin Macdonald, he collapsed while running in Central Park. When examined, he was found to have inoperable, late-stage cancer."
- Stefen Holden, New York Times, April 19, 2012

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"What to see this weekend: paying dues"

""Oki's Movie," playing at Maysles Cinema through Sunday, is set in and around a Korean film school; its subject is the attempt of student filmmakers to get recognition for their work, begin their careers, and, once those careers are underway, to continue on the path of creation, despite the many obstacles they face. The young protagonists' relationships with their professors are as tense, ugly, and dangerous as the dealings of a Hollywood neophyte with a studio head."
- Richard Bordy, New York Magazine, April 20, 2012

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"Oki's Movie"

"Director Hong Sangsoo is South Korea's answer to the accusation that all its movies are good for is a hammer-claw to the face. Take a weekend and familiarize yourself with the best of recent South Korean cinema, and the first thing you'll have to learn is how to live with close-ups of the effects that blunt weapons have on mouths full of teeth, the backs of skulls, achilles tendons, and other tender body parts."
- Alex Peterson, Tiny Mix Tapes

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"A sporadically absorbing romantic drama that's ineffectively low-key."

"Oki's Movie again finds South Korean auteur Hong Sang-soo preoccupied with the nature of cinema, the complications of love and the difficulty of genuine communication. The film lacks the humor and gravitas of some of his previous titles, as themes he's explored previously fall rather flat with further repetition."
- Justin Lowe, Film Journal International, April 16, 2012

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"Hong Sang-soo in New York"

"David Fear in Time Out New York on Oki's Movie: "Like Hong's masterpiece The Power of Kangwon Province (1998), this skewed look at love triangles and fuckups works the sum-of-its-parts construction to sublime effect; you'll find yourself wanting to immediately go back to the beginning and reassess every conversation, every gesture, every long-held grudge…. Forget the snark about him ransacking Eric Rohmer's bag of tricks; the gentle ironies and droll, bitter wit here prove Hong is the French New Waver's heir apparent."
- David Hudson, Mubi, April 16, 2012

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"Oki's Movie"

"By now, critics have noted Hong Sang-soo's tendency to repeat himself, in plots, themes, character types, style and tone. His harshest critics might say he's making the same film over and over again, an exercise in redundancy, but two factors mitigate Hong's repetitiveness. First, the film that he's been making and remaking is a good one. Second, Hong transmutes this repetitiveness into an aesthetic virtue, an acknowledgement that many of contemporary life's dilemmas are not easily resolvable, requiring that we return to them again and again."
- Trevor Link, Spectrum Culture, April 16, 2012

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"'The Day He Arrives' and 'Oki's Movie' Are the Paragons of Hong Sang-Soo's Filmmaking"

""Not many people have seen my films," says Seongjun (Jun-Sang Yu), the impulsive filmmaker at the center of "The Day He Arrives," the latest characteristically rambling character study from Korean director Hong Sang-soo. In one of many cases where art imitates life in a Hong movie, Seongjun's complaint reflects the general unfamiliarity with Hong's work in the United States."
- Eric Kohn, Indiewire, April 16, 2012

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"OKI'S MOVIE at Maysles Cinema"

"If you're familiar with the films of South Korean writer/director Hong Sang-soo, then you know what you're getting into with OKI'S MOVIE. If you're not familiar with his work, think Woody Allen meets Eric Rohmer--i.e., borderline despicable masculine behavior softened by wit and humor. In typical Hong fashion, OKI'S MOVIE flirts with time."
- Hammer to Nail, April 16, 2012

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"'Oki's Movie' at Maysles Cinema"

"You might say that the start of Hong Sang-soo's movie—actually the first of four short movies within the movie, and opens for a week's run at Maysles Cinema on 16 April—sets up some familiar themes, like loss and disappointment, betrayal and desire, memory and forgetting. Jingu is a filmmaker, and so has an interest in such themes, but it's not clear how aware he might be of his construction and participation in his own story."
- Cynthia Fuchs, Pop Matters, April 16, 2012

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"A Sketch Artist Animates a Fraternity of Bumblers"

"The four interrelated tales of "Oki's Movie," Hong Sang-soo's beguiling new film, are preceded by "Pomp and Circumstance," played over handwritten credits. Elgar's stately march becomes an ironic refrain to the misadventures and regrets of the three recurring characters, two men and a woman, who navigate different stages in their lives at a film school. The unsubtle musical theme is also a sharp contrast to Mr. Hong's casually brilliant feat of storytelling, akin to an ingeniously wrought suite of literary short fiction."
- Nicolas Rapold, New York Times, April 15, 2012

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"Oki's Movie"

"In works such as Like You Know It All, Woman on the Beach Tale of Cinema, and Woman Is the Future of Man, Korean director Hong Sang-soo has explored the nature of his craft, using the creative process of filmmaking as a setting for his relationship-driven dramas. He examines the theme again in Oki's Movie, a beautifully told tale told in four sections built around film professor Song (Moon Sung-keun) and students Jingu (Lee Sun-kyun) and Oki (Jung Yumi)."
- This Week In New York

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"Oki's Movie"

"For those of us who know the new Korea (Southern section) only via its rather amazing movies (everything from ultra-violent crime films and romantic comedies to horror/monster movies and others that are simply uncategorizable), Mr. Hong's oeuvre holds a special place. Watching his men-and-women movies it sometimes seems as though, for Korea, more than any other Asian country, an eastern culture has been whacked headlong by the west, so that anything approaching normal behavior from the old days has been replaced by something new and different. "
- James van Maanen, Trust Movies, April 13, 2012

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"Oki's Movie"

"n the sketchiest segment, After the Snowstorm, Song questions his academic career when only Oki and Jingu brave a snowstorm for his class. For their efforts, he entertains their meaning-of-life questions, answering with canned profundities. However, Oki's Movie rebounds with the concluding title segment, in which Oki compares and contrasts two trips she took to Acha Mountain, first with Song and then with Jingu. Demonstrating a fascination with repeated cycles, Oki's Movie, the sub-film, nicely leads into Hong's The Day He Arrives, which as luck would have it opens next Friday in New York."
- Joe Bendel, Libertas Film Magazine, April 13, 2012

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"Hong Sang-soo's Oki's Movie"

"They say one should write about what you know. Hong Sang-soo knows about film school, or at least his characters do. Their lives and films freely blur and overlap in his sort of but not really braided-story film, Oki's Movie (trailer here), which opens this Monday at the Maysles Cinema as something of a ringer in their Documentary in Bloom film series."
- J.B. Spins, April 13, 2012

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"Oki's Movie"

"With Oki's Movie, Hong Sang-soo once again corroborates auteurist theory at the same time that he reveals the potential shortcomings of its practice. To an even greater extent than Like You Know It All, Hong's latest is a lithe serio-comic investigation into his own personal hang-ups, and as with that prior effort, it features so many elements that have calcified into the director's trademarks (solipsistic student and/or director protagonists, boozy escapades, clumsy romantic entanglements, divergent POVs, and segmented narratives) that it feels trifling at best."
- Nick Schager, Slant Magazine, September 21, 2010

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"Oki's Movie (Ok-hui-ui yeonghwa)"

"The fluid nature of the characters and stories—the characters and relationships are subtly different in each short film—makes for a uniquely unsettling experience, enhanced by the overall feature's general coolness. The final segment, however, puts things into rather startling perspective."
- New York Magazine, Apr 16, 2012

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"Oki's Movie (옥희의 영화, Ok-hee-eui Yeong-hwa)"

"This line of dialogue, which is spoken early in Oki's Movie and follows shortly after the statement "Film as an art is dead," might lower audience expectations if it weren't delivered with such devastating irony. With its goofy directness it thoroughly disarms, and so has the opposite effect: we feel drawn to a film that pokes fun not only at filmmaking but at all our personal and cultural aspirations for the medium. Let's start by acknowledging that "the movies" are a sham, writer-director Hong Sang-soo seems to be saying – only then can we hope to redeem them, and ourselves, in even the smallest way."
- Pierce Conran, Modern Korean Cinema, April 13, 2012

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"Oki's Movie"

"Oki's Movie is a curiosity: A series of short films within a film which purport to be based on the autobiographical musings of its fictional titular character, starring actors chosen for their resemblance to that character's "real life" partners, as well as herself. It's a potentially confusing premise that somehow comes together beautifully to create a picture that's both captivating and emotional."
- The Lady Miz Diva, The Diva Review, April 12, 2012

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"U.S. theatrical premiere of OKI'S MOVIE by HONG Sang-soo"

"Oki's Movie shares a number of characteristics with the other three films. Each has a young male filmmaker as either the main character or one of the main characters. (Oki's Film, as I've mentioned, also has a female film director as a main protagonist, as well as another male filmmaker as a secondary protagonist.) In each there is a lot of eating and even more drinking going on. And the four films share stylistic consistencies such as a basically static, tripod-mounted camera that utilizes occasional slow zooms."
- Dr. Stan Glick , AsianCineFest, April 13, 2012

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"OKI'S MOVIE"

"The subtly intricate construction of Hong Sang-soo's harsh, self-deprecatingly comical romance, set in a Korean university's film department, lends its four brief sketchlike episodes a novelistic density."
- Richard Brody, The New Yorker

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"Oki's Movie"

"Astoundingly prolific, if not always profound, and the most European of South Korea's cream-of-the-crop cinéastes, Hong Sang-soo has carved out a lovely niche for himself as a chronicler of men behaving badly. His heroes, if you could use such a term to describe his a-hole protagonists, are frustrated males who let their selfish sexual desires, petty professional jealousies and overall immaturity rule their lives and ruin everyone else's."
- David Fear, Time Out New York, April 10, 2012

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"Oki's Movie"

"If the characterizations are fleeting, the recessive mood is not: Hong's signature observational style is at once offhanded and astute, romantic and lightly chilled. "Pomp and Circumstance" recurs as a melancholy theme, as does the idea that academia and creativity don't mix as well as the adjuncts of the world would like. "
- Michelle Orange, The Village Voice, April 11, 2012

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"Slight Return: Two Films By Hong Sang-Soo"

"Over the course of the "three or four days" of Seong-jun's visit—he's vague about the length of his stay, and it becomes hard to keep track of the wash of days—he wears the same clothes, drinks the same beer at the same bars, and sees the same people, even running into the same ex-colleague every day, and deflecting her same nervous giggles. Hong shoots the early South Korean winter in melancholy, slightly tinny black-and-white, scored to tinkling piano; his vision, especially as his camera zooms in to trap Seong-jun in interactions with casual acquaintances, is of social life as purgatorial loop."
- Mark Asch, The L Magazine, April 11, 2012

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"Home is where the art is: The 19th New York African Film Festival carries homeland theme "

"We continue to present the best in contemporary and classic African cinema with the goal of challenging the audience's preconceptions," says festival founder Mahen Bonetti, who was born in Sierra Leone."
- Joyce White, New York Daily News, April 6, 2012

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"Old School Event: Under the Influence of Lava at Maysles Cinema in Harlem"

"This event celebrating the original writers from the turn of the seventies was curated by Lava, who himself is one of the original masters. The event lasted about five hours and included a screening of Lava's movie called Urban Writers in the Streets of NYC, which was shown twice, as well as a short slide show of live painting sessions."
- Daniel Feral, 12ozprophet, March 22, 2012

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"African Film in the Spotlight at the New York African Film Festival"

"This is a continuation of the discussion about the shape of Africa that has taken place since Independence and that is now not being embraced by the younger generation," said African Film Festival, Inc. Executive Director and Founder Mahen Bonetti. "Though these young people have not in many ways been thrown a lifeline as post-Independent conflict emerged, they have somehow managed, through technology, to craft their own narrative, unconsciously drawing on the past and creating something new and very modern without having disavowed the past."
- Eurweb, April 3, 2012

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"See Trailer for Gun Violence Documentary, Produced by Harlem Teens"

"The New York District Attorney's office and Harlem Hospital initially asked the program to help highlight a citywide anti-gun violence initiative, anchored by the first ever gun shot victim trauma center in the community. The students were asked to produce a film about the nature of gun violence in Harlem and its effects on the community."
- Jasmin, Indiewire, March 18, 2012

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"From the Islands to the Island "

"Alternatively called “romantic reggae,” lover’s rock is evolved from African rhythms and dance -- from an original forty-five degree crouch to straight up and down, observes an instructor -- and through and parallel to Jamaican reggae evolved from mento through ska, toasting, poppa-top, rock steady and rockers."
- Donald Levit, Reel Talk Movie

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"Sing Your Song at Maysles Cinema"

"With remarkable intimacy, visual style, and musical panache Sing Your Song, surveys the inspiring life of singer, actor, and activist Harry Belafonte. From his rise to fame as a singer and his experiences touring a segregated country, to his crossover into Hollywood, Belafonte's groundbreaking career personifies the American civil rights movement."
- Ulysses, Harlem + Bespoke, March 13th 2012

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"Women In Jazz: In Good Time, The Piano Jazz of Marian McPartland"

"A native of England, McPartland arrived in America in 1948 with her husband Jimmy McPartland and established herself as a leading musician in the male-dominated jazz world. Now 93, McPartland tells her own story through interviews filmed over 4 years."
-Manhattan Times News, March 07, 2012

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"Vigilante Vigilante"

"This week, there are at least three discussions about street art and graffiti that look worth checking out. The first two events are in New York at screenings of the film Vigilante Vigilante. VV is a film that I've been hoping to see for at least a year. It's about the people who take graffiti removal into their own hands and paint over graffiti without permission."
- RJ Rushmore, Vandalog, March 6, 2012

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"They Grow Along Sideways"

"Callard stands behind an ironing board, pondering curiosity, and the possibilities provided by yellow objects. "If you want to find something," she says, "Sometimes you can look in the Yellow Pages, and if you want to go somewhere, you can take a taxi, or if you want to find somewhere to go, you can read theNational Geographic." (…) Such divergence between language and "real life" is one of several notions raised in Talking Landscape. (...) Callard, somewhat like Miranda July, offers a particular view of seemingly everyday experience, except that this view makes it all unfamiliar at the same time."
- Cynthia Fuchs, Popmatters, February 13, 2012

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"Andrea Callard's Early Media Work "

"Speaking directly into the camera, she makes an eerie, tone-deaf correlation: "Here's the natural procedure. First you find a desired vacation spot in National Geographic; then you rent a taxi to the airport, umm... well, first, you find a taxi in the Yellow Pages and you call them up..." The joke is twofold: the idea of items bound together by color speaks to a kid's pointless sense of rigorous organization, which isn't a bad analogy for the just-industrialized planet."
- Steve Macfarlane, The L Magazine, February 13, 2012

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"Early Media Work, 1974-1984 "

"The Times Square Show takes viewers on a tour of the seminal art show held in June 1980, which sought to investigate "the need to communicate in a larger world"; the Colab exhibition comprised works by Keith Haring, Lee Quinones, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Jenny Holzer, Kenny Scharf, John Ahearn, Kiki Smith, Otterness, Callard, and others held in the then-still-seedy neighborhood. Throughout the film, Callard displays a wry sense of humor in these brief experimental works that were part of a major shift in the New York City art scene."
- This Week In New York

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"Andrea Callard: Early Media Work, 1974-1984 at Maysles Cinema"

"Toward the end Callard gives us two very different short programs, each, I think, worth the entire, larger program. In one of these she assembles a slide show of photos (see above, and the two below) taken in various countries, each slide captioned rather oddly. After we see this once, the artist repeats this slide show a second time, and whether or not it is slightly speeded up, I am not sure, but this time, I realized that those "captions" actually work together to make a statement of sorts. But then Callard shows us this a third time, which for me was once too many."
- James van Maanen, Trust Movies, February 10, 2012

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"Talking Landscape: Early Media Work, 1974-1984"

"Chicago-born Andrea Callard, among the first wave of Tribeca artist-settlers in the early '70s, loved to find the country in the city. Several of her Super 8 short films from that period on view at her Maysles tribute (which also includes slide shows of her hand-colored print collages) reveal nature's splendor in the most unlikely places: Notes on Ailanthus is a reverential précis of the tree of the title, known as the "tree of heaven" or, as the filmmaker reminds us, "the tree that grows in Brooklyn."
- Melissa Anderson, The Village Voice, February 8, 2012

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"Documentary Interventions"

"Andrea Callard's film bites have the feeling of a high school video class gone horribly right. Whether talking to the camera stony-eyed over an ironing board, climbing the ladders in her downtown apartment, or musing aloud on the azalea bushes creeping over New York's bald patches, it's fuzzy who exactly she's trying to reach. A "personal essay committed to film" definition would fit, but so would "video art" if you took her thoughts and games for a performance and Callard for a canvas."
- By JN, BLOMBlog, February 15, 2012

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"New York City-based installment and media artist "

"Andrea Callard is a poet of deceptively slight observations about modern urban living. Her delivery is so fluffy, in fact, that it frequently evinces an apathetic restlessness. (...) Callard is the missing link between similar metropolitan performance artists Laurie Anderson and Miranda July; she affects the prosaic, discursive, faux-monologist's voice of the former and the cutely disappointed distance—as well as the penchant for talking animals (…) But where Anderson responded to her milieu's de rigueur alienation with ponderousness and July fights off loneliness with an earnest, almost obstinate optimism, Callard feigns an ironic impenetrability."
- Joseph Jon Lanthie, Slant Magazine, February 12, 2012

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"Remembering Black Wall Street 90 Years Later at Maysles Cinema in Harlem "

"This 2008 documentary chronicles the 1921 race riot in the affluent African-American neighborhood of Greenwood, in Tulsa, Oklahoma, including updates from those that are left of the survivors. Before They Die exposes the horrors that have been silenced for over 90 years and took place in the African-American self-dependent district of Tulsa, OK, also known as "Black Wall Street." The city of Tulsa was known for it's oil industry which helped residents, black and white, to flourish. The city was home to notable African-American lawyers, business people, doctors, and many more. The noteworthy success in the town of the African-American residents was both rare and inspirational to other."
-Harlem World, February 6, 2012

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"Documentary: Tulsa Race Massacres"

"This is the story of what is perhaps the the worst race riot in the history of the United States that many people have never even heard of. On May 30th, 1921, in Tulsa, Oklahoma, in less than 24 hours, the prosperous African-American section of Greenwood, also known as "Black Wall Street," was completely destroyed. An estimated 300 killed, and over 10,000 people displaced overnight as a 42 square block area of their homes and businesses were burned to the ground by a white mob that had been deputized by the sheriff. This is the story of the survivors of the 1921 Tulsa Race Riot and their quest for justice. This is the story of the struggle for the soul of America and the efforts to right a wrong that is long past due. Justice is the subject of the night's film."
-Black Star News, February 20, 2012

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"More Than a Month' at Maysles Cinema on Black History Month's Last Day"

"Shukree Hassan Tilghman wants to end Black History Month. He's got his reasons, and most of them are familiar: for one thing, by "relegating" black history to one short month each year, it keeps American histories separate and unequal. For another, it generates a Black History commercial products industry that demeans the very history it means to celebrate. To track his quest, he's made a film, More Than a Month. (...) The film raises serious questions while offering a bit of antic framing, interviewing people with investments in history, then pondering how those investments have come to be. As the film seeks value in Black History Month, to understand the purposes it serves, it also finds value in ongoing debates over it."
- Cynthia Fuchs, Popmatters.com, February 29th, 2012

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"More Than A Month"

"Shukree Hassan Tilghman, a 29-year-old African-American filmmaker, sets out on a cross-country campaign to end Black History Month. He stops in various cities, wearing a sandwich board, to solicit signatures on his petition to end the observance. He explains that relegating Black History Month to the coldest, shortest month of the year is an insult, and that black history is not separate from American history. Through this thoughtful and humorous journey, he explores what the treatment of history tells us about race and equality in a "post-racial" America."
- PBS

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"He Would End Black History Month"

"More Than a Month tackles a question larger than why Black History Month exists; Tilghman wonders what it means that it still exists -- and what it would mean if it didn't. INTERVIEW"
- Anthonia Akitunde, TheRoot.com, February 17, 2012

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"Travel Back In Style With The Pan Am Black Birds"

"On February 22nd, New York Parlouristas and style lovers will have the chance to relive the golden-era of travel when the Maysles Institute hosts a discussion featuring the Pan Am Black Birds, the African-American flight attendants of the famed airline which was not only known for the beauty of the staff, but the brains and personality of the select women. Fans of the surprise hit ABC tv series Pan Am can already transport themselves to the time when air-travel was for when only the lucky ones who could afford it, and when they could—were treated to a level of luxury service only found in the most prestigious of first-class cabins today."
- Shannon Washington, Parlour Magazine, February 16, 2012

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"Thelonious Monk: Straight, No Chaser "

"Jazz aficionado Clint Eastwood exec-produced this tribute to the legendary pianist, chock-full of stunning '60s concert footage."
- Time Out New York

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"Filmmakers Head to the Country, in Several Countries"

"...Summer Pasture, a highlight of the festival (the film is scheduled to open on Aug. 15 at the Maysles Cinema in Harlem), is both an elegy for a dying way of life and a portrait of an amazingly resilient marriage. The real takeaway for a farm kid, though, was that all the rashes I got from handling chemical fertilizers didn't seem so bad once I had watched a Tibetan woman spreading out, by hand, huge piles of yak manure to dry. "
- Mike Hale, The New York Times August 4, 2011

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"Summer Pasture"

""It's not good to do nothing. You should always be busy." And so Yama is. A Tibetan nomad who's spending yet another summer in Dzachukha, Sichuan Province, China....Yama doesn't need to seek work, as she reveals throughout the remarkable documentary, Summer Pasture—made by Lynn True, Nelson Walker, and Tsering Perlo, and premiering at Maysles Cinema 15 August."
- Cynthia Fuchs, PopMatters, August 15, 2011
9/10 star review

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  Summer Pasture
 

"Summer Pasture Dir. Lynn True, Nelson Walker & Tsering Perlo "

"To receive a nomination for the Gotham Independent Film Awards in the category “Best Film Not Playing at a Theater Near You” is a bittersweet honor, perhaps mediated by an increased hope for theatrical distribution (last year’s winner, Ry Russo-Young’s You Won't Miss Me is finally in theaters a year later). I hope such a fate befalls the documentary Summer Pasture, an interesting and rich portrait of nomadic life among a Tibetan yak-herding family."
- Susanna Locascio, Tiny Mix Tapes

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  Summer PastureTiny Mix Tapes
 

"A Life Herding Yaks, Modernity on the Horizon"

"Locho and Yama, the Tibetan couple who are the focus of the enthralling documentary "Summer Pasture," are nomadic herders pursuing a way of life that has changed little over 4,000 years. For all the hardship they endure, this intimate dual portrait, directed by Lynn True and Nelson Walker, with Tsering Perlo, suggests that their lives are neither more nor less fulfilled than those of any highly stressed upper-middle-class Americans."
- Stephen Holden, The New York Times August 14, 2011
*NY TIMES CRITICS PICK

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  Summer Pasture
 

"Summer Pasture (Documentary -- U.S.-China-Tibet)"

"Across the green velvet hills and sweeping grassland of eastern Tibet, nomads have moved along with the seasons for 4,000 years. Whether they'll last another 20 is the question in "Summer Pasture," a remarkably intimate docu woven out of tradition and change, and the endearing subjects who contend with both. Avoidance of any political issues will likely derail interest among free-Tibet factions, but Lynn True and Nelson Walker's portrait is rich in anthropological value. An extended festival run seems likely before cable play."
- John Anderson, Variety, August 3, 2011

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  Summer Pasture
 

"Los Labios Film Review: Slant Magazine"

"Stories about collective suffering usually become a slave to their own self-importance, or even worse, a faux-pulpit for the self-congratulatory viewer looking for emotional relief. Los Labios actually finds a sense of freedom within the tragic realities and incomplete perceptions of its brave women immersed in difficult work."
-Slant Magazine, June 16, 2011

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"What's Showing Today? Monday, June 13"

"The June offering of Maysles Cinema's bi-monthly Documentary in Bloom program begins its weeklong run tonight. The Lips is a 2010 Cannes Un Certain Regard pick about three community care workers in an impoverished rural South American village. Though the women are played by actresses, much of the film is apparently nonfiction with an empathetic look at the inhabitants of its remote settings."
-Screen Slate, June 13, 2011

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"Los Labios"

"Actually, this is a film that flies high and allows itself to discover and narrate lives, taking a chance with pain and the small joys while stuck right down in the dirt (a dirt that can have the innocence of play and the nobility of liberation), and which tells its story by framing reality in a way that thoroughly fragments a whole they resend us to with modesty and respect."
-IndieWire, June , 2011

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"Under the Influence of Le Tigre: Time Out New York"

"Director Kerthy Fix plays Pennebaker to the feminist indie-pop trio of Kathleen Hanna, Joanna Fateman and JD Samson in the 2010 doc Who Took the Bomp? Le Tigre on Tour, which screens tonight. Then Fix, Hanna and Fateman answer your questions."
-Time Out New York, June, 2011

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"The Lips (Los Labios): Finding A Way"

"The film, written and directed by Iván Fund and Santiago Loza, is part fiction and part documentary, its combination of professional and nonprofessional actors blurring the line, expanding the ways that stories can work. The women don't talk very much among themselves, but they don't need to: what they see and share is intricate and repeatedly arduous."
- Cynthia Fuchs, PopMatters, June 13, 2011

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"Cannes Award Winner 'The Lips' Premieres at Harlem's Unique Maysles Cinema"

"The Lips (Los Labios), an award winning feature film from Argentina, will debut at Harlem's Maysles Cinema as a highlight of its Documentary In Bloom film series, for one week beginning June 13th. Co-directed by Ivan Fund and Santiago Losa, The Lips won the 2010 Cannes Film Festival Certain Regard Award for Best Actress, a prize shared by the three ensemble lead actresses, Adela Sanchez, Eva Bianco, and Victoria Raposo."
- Prairie Miller, News Blaze, June 11, 2011

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"The Subterranean Homelessness Blues"

"In 2000, the black-and-white documentary "Dark Days" shined a light on about 100 New Yorkers who literally lived out of sight and out of mind. Deep in a disused Amtrak tunnel beneath the west side of Manhattan, homeless men and women inhabited jerry-built huts, living off scraps and siphoning electricity to cook and brighten the way. Their resilience, ingenuity and tenacity were extraordinary, even as their subterranean circumstances seemed an all-too-apt expression of this city's conflicted relationship with its least fortunate."
- Nicolas Rapold, Wall Street Journal, June 8, 2011

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"A Little Lipstick Soothes Poverty's Rawness"

"A small film with a gigantic heart, The Lips casts a spell far greater than its modest narrative. Shadowing three government social workers (perfectly embodied by Victoria Raposo, Eva Bianco and Adela Sanchez) on a trip deep into the impoverished Argentine countryside, this affecting merger of fact and fiction unfolds so naturally that the line between becomes immaterial."
- Jeannette Catsouluis, The New York Times, June 12, 2011

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"Local film festivals: Brooklyn Film Festival, Cinefest Petrobas Brasil, Gen Art Film Festival"

"If you're feeling nostalgic, you might also consider the Maysles Institute's yearly Grey Gardens celebration (mayslesinstitute.org). The weekend program, which includes documentaries like "Beyond This Place," about a man reconciling with his hippie dad, winds up with-what else?-"Grey Gardens," Albert and David Maysles' 1975 documentary about the notorious Beale sisters and their decaying Hamptons home."
- Elizabeth Weitzman, NY Daily News, June 10, 2011

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"Social Work: Three Women Attempt to Understand One Argentinean Village in The Lips"

"With a decaying former hospital as their base of operations, three social workers survey an unnamed Argentinean backwater, tallying cases of malnutrition and how many children sleep to a room. Co-directors Iván Fund and Santiago Loza emphasize the distance between these women and the community they're charged with assisting."
- Benjamin Mercer, The Village Voice, June 8, 2011

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"Grey Gardens: Family Style"

"Nothing like a little family style to kick off the weekend. From June 10 through 12, The Third Annual Grey Gardens Staunch Fest celebrates staunch families on film. Specifically, the 1976 documentary Grey Gardens by (appropriately enough) brothers Albert and David Maysles features a mother and daughter who prove that the apple doesn't fall far from the tree."
- City Arts, June 9, 2011

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"Date With the Night: Crushing on Kathleen Hanna"

"I'm one of those people who thinks women are often hardest on each other, but the heady mix of my third beer with Fateman's optimism made it feel, for at least one evening, like girls really are, and always have been, secretly in charge."
- Lizzy Goodman, MTV Hive, June 9, 2011

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"The Beales of Grey Gardens at the Maysles Cinema."

"The 3rd Annual Grey Gardens Festival at the Maysles Cinema will be featuring the great documentaries that made the Maysles Brothers famous. The cult movie about Jackie Onassis' eccentric relatives living on their declining estate called Grey Gardens has been made into a Broadway play and an HBO movie in the past few years so check out the follow-up film by the director who lives in Harlem."
-Harlem+ Bespoke Blog, June 7, 2011

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"Kavery Kaul's 'Back Walking Forward' - June Screenings"

"Kaul's famously intimate and character-driven approach to filmmaking is forceful in Back Walking Forward, telling the story of Eric, who at age 19 was derailed in an auto accident and who, at age 33, is trying to learn to walk again."
- Jennifer Merin, About.com , June 6, 2011

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  New York Post
 

"'Fresh': They're Comfortable and They Eat"

""Chickens," says Joel Salatin, are our "fellow workers, alongside of us. We allow them to fully express their chickenness." Salatin knows from chickenness—as well as cowness, pigness, and tomoatoness, all part of an essential balance that industrial farming disrupts daily."
- Cynthia Fuchs, PopMatters , June 6, 2011

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  PopMatters
 

"'Who Took The Bomp' mention in NY Post"

"Le Tigre, the electro-punk, feminist trio, hits the road in Karthy Fix's amusing "Who Took the Bomp?" (2010), which will be shown Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. at the Maysles Cinema. Fix follows the rockers -- Kathleen Hanna, Johanna Fateman and JD Samson -- during their yearlong, four-continent tour in support of their album 'This Island'."
- V.A. Musetto, New York Post , June 4, 2011

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  New York Post
 

'Who Took the Bomp? Le Tigre on Tour screening with Le Tigre & director Q&A'"

"While the band remains on hiatus, Le Tigre fans have a reason to come out of hibernation for at least one night: a special screening of Kerthy Fix's entertaining documentary Who Took the Bomp? Tailing the self-consciously feminist electro-pop trio during their final tour in 2004, the film is full of humorous anecdotes and commentary that give insight into each member's personality. In addition to filmmaker Fix, Le Tigre members Kathleen Hanna and Johanna Fateman are on hand for a post-screening Q&A."
- Mindy Bond, Flavorpill , *Editor's Pick* June, 2011

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  Flavorpill
 

" The Harlem International Film Festival (Hi!)is proud to present a special screening of Juliano Mer Khamis' award-winning film, ARNA'S CHILDREN"

"This tribute celebrates the life and work of award-winning filmmaker Juliano Mer Khamis - actor, director, humanist and freedom fighter - who would have turned 53 years-old on May 29. He was tragically shot and killed last month by a masked assailant in front of his pregnant wife, while he held his one year-old son in his arms, right outside the theater that he and his mother established to cultivate creativity, critical thinking and hope in Palestinian children living inside the virtual prison of Jenin Refugee Camp."
- Harlem International Film Festival, June 2011

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  Harlem International Film Festival
 

"VIDEO: DJ Hollywood on the Origins of Hip-Hop"

"On April 28, 2011, ego trip (along with Andreas Vingaard) presented a screening of the award-winning documentary film White Lines & The Fever: The Death of DJ Junebug at the esteemed Maysles Cinema in Harlem."
-Egotripland, May 18, 2011

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  Egotripland
 

"Film Scoring: Gary Meister of Naturalistic on Composing for "Concrete Steel and Paint" "
" The film's creators describe Concrete – which Robert Koehler of the Huffington Post called "an extraordinary documentary" – this way: "When men in a Pennsylvania prison join with victims of crime to create a mural about healing, their views on punishment, remorse, and forgiveness collide."
- David Weiss,Sonic Scoop, May 17, 2011

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  SonicScoop
 

"SYMBIOPSYCHOTAXIPLASM "
- Alt Screen, Editors Pick; Also recommended, May 14, 2011
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  AltScreen
 

"Black X: African Diaspora Experimental Film Series In NYC This Weekend"

"Black experimental filmmakers and films don't get a lot of love it seems… I remember, several years ago, an African American college professor of mine, sharing a story to us during a lecture, about his entries into an experimental film showcase, and being met with a perplexed reception when the organizers and audiences realized that the filmmaker whose films they were watching, was black… because, for some reason, black filmmakers aren't expected to be working within the experimental genre."
- IndieWire , May 12, 2011

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  Indiewire
 

"In The Face Of Adversity, An Evening Of Celebration"

"When the Maysles Institute in Harlem screened "Waiting for 'Superman'" the first weekend in April, they paired it with an early cut of our response. I led a discussion after one of the screenings and the feedback was incredibly positive. Attendees said GEM's fact-based analysis caused them to completely re-think what they had heard in the original movie."
-Liza Campbell Gotham Schools , May 11, 2011

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  Gotham Schools Blog
 

"A Harlem Mother" screens at Maysles' Cinema in NYC"

"On Wednesday, April 27th Beyond Bullets took part in a screening at Maysles Cinema in Harlem. It was an honor to screen Bullets in the Hood at such an esteemed community space which was founded by renowned filmmaker Albert Maysles."
--Ivana Todorovic IvanaTodorovic.com , May 10, 2011

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  Ivana Todorovic
 

"Octubre" | "Caterpillar" | "Bananas!*"

"Este lunes se dará en Harlem una presentación especial de un documental político. En el cine Maysles se va a dar el filme "Bananas!*", que se centra en un caso judicial donde trabajadores nicaragüenses demandaron a una compañía multinacional que opera en su país. Después de la presentación de la película, que sale la pronto en DVD, estará presente el director de la cinta, Fredrik Gertten."
-Jerónimo Rodríguez NY1 Noticias , May 8, 2011

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  Noticias
 

"Bananas: Monday, May 9th - Editor's Pick "

Alt Screen Website, May 7, 2011

"An extremely well crafted film…This is life. This is litigation. This is a front row seat to a history making event, that of third world claimants being heard as plaintiffs for the first time in a U.S. Court. That in and of itself makes this film worthwhile…And as with all good documentaries, it raises questions – and not just about the legal turmoil – but about corporate responsibility, ethics and human rights.
"
-Debbie Lynn Elias for n:zone magazine
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  AltScreen
 

"Special Screenings/On DVD: BANANAS!*"

"Swedish filmmaker Fredrik Gertten's exploration of the case of Nicaraguan banana plantation workers against Dole generated headlines before its scheduled world premiere in competition at the 2009 Los Angeles Film Festival when Dole threatened to sue both Gertten and the LAFF for slander."
-What Not to Doc; May 5, 2011
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  What Not To Doc
 

"White Lines & the Fever & SBX! at Maysles Cinema"

"Last Thursday evening we closed out our hip-hop film series at the Maysles Cinema with screenings of White Lines & the Fever: The Death of DJ Junebug, and SBX! Holding Down the Tradition."
-Egotripland; May 2, 2011
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  Egotripland
 
"Thank You Maysles Cinema!"

"On Wednesday, April 27th Beyond Bullets took part in a screening at Maysles Cinema in Harlem. It was an honor to screen Bullets in the Hood at such an esteemed community space which was founded by renowned filmmaker Albert Maysles."
-Beyond Bullets, Downtown Community Television Center
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  Beyond Bullets
 

"NY African Film Festival Resumes April 29th - May 1st at Maysles Cinema"

"Doc Watchers presents the next leg of the 18th Annual New York African Film Festival, April 29 through May 1st at the Maysles Cinema. The event includes the US Premiere of Zimbabwe's Forgotten Children and Q&A's with Peabody Award-winning filmmaker Xoliswa Sithole after the 7:30pm screenings.
"
-Words Like Whoa; April 28, 2011
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  Words Like Whoa
 

"Kati With an I: Full of Difficult, Non-Trivial Choices"

"Uneven and earnest, subtle and beguiling, Kati With an I reflects [Kati's] experience without judging it, and suggests a context without overstating it."
-Cynthia Fuchs(PopMatters Film and TV editor) PopMatters, April 8, 2011

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  Pop Matters
 

"Kati with an I"

"This beguiling, intimate documentary portrait of a young Alabama teen and her coming of age takes the ordinary and makes something uniquely cinematic out of it, thanks to Greene's welcome flair for the poetic. ."
- New York Magazine, *Critics Pick*, Week of April 8, 2011

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  new York mag
 

"Awakened Identities"

"A moving vérité portrait of an Alabama teenager during the 72 hours before her high-school graduation, this documentary won the Gotham Awards 2010 prize for Best Film Not Playing at a Theater Near You. Well, now it is. As part of curator Livia Bloom's bimonthly series devoted to new documentaries, "Kati With an I," by New York filmmaker Robert Greene, gets a weeklong run, with bittersweet glimpses of a young life in transition that owes little to polished MTV realities..."Kati" shares a bill with Peggy Ahwesh's experimental 2010 short film "The Third Body," which uses NASA video from the 1980s to juxtapose the realms of faith and science. Mr. Greene will be present at Friday and Saturday screenings."
-Steve Dollar, Wallstreet Journal , April 7, 2011

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  Wall street Journal
 

"A Girl Moves Toward Adulthood"

"Taking its own sweet time to release information, Kati With an I, Robert Greene's endearing documentary about a strong-willed Southern girl's transition to adulthood, finds virtue in vagueness and significance in the everyday... Buoyed by a fully integrated soundtrack, Kati With an I delivers a lovingly personal observation of young people at a crossroads. The film's sound is not always crisp, but no matter: Kati's story is written in every vital, vérité frame."
- Jeannette Catsouluis, The New York Times, *Critics Pick* April 7, 2011

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  Kati with an I
 

"Kati with an I"

"There's a strange and probably impossible purity to Kati with an I, Robert Greene's first documentary feature (his second, Fake It So Real, is currently on the festival circuit). Impossible because it's a contemporary story about young love that doesn't display or refer to any text messages or emails or Facebook, because it makes a Red Jumpsuit Apparatus song sort of make you want to cry, and because its central tension feels so profoundly earnest..."
-Christopher Gray Slant Magazine, April 6, 2011

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  Slant Magazine
 

"PHOTOS: "Writing On the Wall" & "Rap City" at the Maysles Cinema"

Follow the link for photos of the event!
- Egotripland, April 5, 2011

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  Egotripland
 

"Kati with an I"

"A smart teen girl about to graduate from high school faces an uncertain future in Robert Greene's sensitive if somewhat messy docu, "Kati With an I." As if shot from the p.o.v. of one of Kati Genthner's girlfriends, Greene's film heightens the chaos that runs through everyday life, occasionally shifting to clips from Genthner's childhood in the small town of Jacksonville, Ala. With a following built on the fest circuit, pic's weeklong run, starting Friday at New York's Maysles Cinema, could kick-start a grassroots national tour."
- Robert Koehler, Variety, April 3, 2011

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  Variety
 

"Kati with an I and Circo"

"...The reason I love "Kati" and docs like it are that it unfolds an experience without me knowing what's going to happen, if anything. Just like life. Fortunately, there are some interesting developments, much of them subtle and slowly established, throughout."
-Christopher Campbell Indie Wire, March 31, 2011

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  Indie Wire
 

"Q&A: Blake "KEO" Lethem, Graf Legend & Original White Rapper"

"Directed by Sandra King, originally aired on New Jersey public television, and rarely seen in full since, Writing On the Wall chronicles the adventures of Brick City graf writer Micah HAKIM Kelly's VOS (Vandals On the Street) crew. But perhaps the film's most intriguing point of historical significance is its footage of a young Blake Lethem, a/k/a KEO X-MEN, a/k/a Lord Scotch, a/k/a Scotch 79 – graf writer, visual artist, emcee – during his tenure with VOS."Egotripland, March 30, 2011
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  Writing on the WallEgotripland logo
 

"Some Will Rob You with a Fountain Pen "

"Client 9: The Rise and Fall of Elliot Spitzer had inaugurated True Crime the previous evening, and there is double irony in that the now-TV face and disgraced former New York State attorney general and governor speaks often in this second offering: "double" in that, after audience guffaws at a juxtaposition of high-end business-expense call girls and his appearance, his is among the saner voices of knowledge, warning and meaningful suggestions. Personal foibles, he pleads, are not the equivalent of swindle and cynicism..." Review of Inside Job screening as part of the True Crime NY series by Donald Levit, Reel Talk - Movie Reviews, March, 2011
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  Documentary in Bloom - February
 

"Doc Talk: What's the Most Important Ethical Concern for Documentary Today?"

"… Filmmaker Robert Greene agrees that documentary as journalism "is a flawed, limited thing," even while admitting that the legal controversy with 'Crude' is a serious issue and highlighting 'Restrepo' as a great example of the "new journalism" documentary. "I don't want my films called 'journalism,' he says. "There's too many decisions made for story and cinematic purposes in the best nonfiction films for them to be considered 'journalism.' And thank god for that." Greene, whose excellent verite film about his half-sister, 'Kati with an I,' opens in NYC next Friday, concludes that above all "you have to tell the truth, even if it takes manipulation, editing and 'directing' to get you there." … "
-Christopher Campbell blog by Moviefone's Cinematical blog, March 30, 2011

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  Variety
 

"Writing On the Wall" Documentary: HAKIM In His Own Words"

" With next week's screenings in our "Under the Influence of ego trip Pt. 2" film series approaching we reached out to HAKIM (aka Micah Kelly) – featured artist in the film Writing On the Wall – to reflect back on his memories of the Newark graf scene, and share his thoughts on the 1986 documentary in his own words. Interview and PIX after the jump… "
- Egotripland, March 23, 2011

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  Egotripland
 

ADAM BHALA LOUGH AND ETHAN HIGBEE, 'THE UPSETTER'

" Widely revered in reggae and hip-hop circles, Lee "Scratch" Perry is one of 20th century music's most influential and mysterious artists, a tried-and-true rasta man whose lasting contribution goes beyond spawning some of reggae's most seminal acts. He was, in fact, the driver for the aesthetic innovations that germinated into the two genres mentioned above, and he reinvented the image of the studio engineer from mere technician to artistic focal point. Now in his mid seventies and expatriated to Switzerland, he's the subject of the feature-length doc The Upsetter, from the directors Adam Bhala Lough (The Carter, Weapons) and Ethan Higbee (Red Apples Falling)."
- Brandon Harris, Filmmaker Magazine, March 23, 2011

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  Filmmaker Magazine
 

"Night Catches Us at the House of Maysles"

"With cinema vérité master Albert Maysles filming, those of us who packed the Maysles Cinema last night experienced Night Catches Us, a film by Tanya Hamilton, as well as a post-screening Q&A with Hamilton and Jamal Joseph, Associate Professor and Chair at Columbia University School of the Arts (Film), writer, director, poet, and one of the youngest members of the Black Panther Party. Added to that were audience members who were also Panthers, contributing to the heart-felt and hard-hitting discussion about making film that is more art than entertainment and what it was like to be a member of the Black Panthers in the heat of it. [...]Go to the Maysles Cinema. It's a great place for some revolutionary inspiration."
- glowinski, Across 106th Street blog, March 20, 2011

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  Across 106th Street
 

"Waking Lives, Dream States"

"Every other month, freelance film curator Livia Bloom presents new documentaries for a weeklong run at this Harlem temple to nonfiction cinema in all its forms. The series leads off with two quite different approaches to memory, family and place. First, New York underground film legend Ken Jacobs offers the short piece "Today Was a Scorcher." The brief effort revisits a family trip to Rome in the 1970s, in which ambient travel footage is made over into stroboscopic visual loops, at once hypnotic and heightened in perception. Palestinian director Kamal Aljafari's variations on the home movie look practically stately in comparison. His recent "Port of Memory" turns its focus on his family, facing the prospect of losing its home, applying a lyrical, contemplative camera to a mix of documentary and fictive narrative techniques. Mr. Aljafari will be present for Q&A sessions on Friday and Saturday."
- Steve Dollar, The Wall Street Journal, Feb. 11, 2011

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  Documentary in Bloom - February
 

"Port of Memory: An Oblique Demi-Documentary With Surprisingly Vivid Images"

"An oblique, impressionist portrait of Arabs living in Jaffa, Kamal Aljafari's Port of Memory is only an hour long, but quietly and atmospherically touches on the Kiarostamian Uncertainty Principle, with Aljafari liberally corrupting his demi-documentary with scripted dialogue, rehearsals, and even digital effects. [...] Accompanying the film are Aljafari's silent doc short Balconies (a diptych rumination on the balconied vestiges of Ramle) and Ken Jacobs's magical The Day Was a Scorcher, which subtly fragments and reincarnates family photos from a '70s Rome excursion into a shuttering, 3-D valentine to the master's family."
- Michael Atkinson, The Village Voice, February 9, 2011

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  Documentary in Bloom - FebruaryThe Village Voice Logo
 

"Albert Maysles, Moving Up In The World"

"Philip and his colleague Jessica Green schedule the films together (pictured above sandwiching the Young Harlem Award). 'My background in hip hop and media mesh well with Philip's fine art sensibilities,' said Jessica.
'We're the only cinema in the city showing documentaries exclusively,' said Albert. 'It helps to put Harlem on the (film industry) map.'"
- Yolande Brener, Harlem World blog, February 12, 2011

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  Harlem World
 
"Black History Month: Celebrate African-American heritage at these events"

"Time Out NY features our listings - Sharifa Rhodes-Pitts and The Cool World (Feb. 5), Doc Watcher's screening of Prep School Negro (Feb. 7), and National Jazz Museum's Jazz on Film screening (Feb. 8) in their recommendations for celebrating Black History Month! "A relative newcomer to the uptown art-house scene, this 55-seat cinema (cofounded by Oscar-nominated documentarian Albert Maysles) seeks to honor its neighbors by letting its patrons participate in the programming..."
- Article by Jennifer M. Wood,Time Out New York, February 1, 2011

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  CinemaTime Out NY
 
"HW Weekend Picks: Black History Month At Maysles"

"Yola!Africa's celebration of the work of Congolese director Petna Katondolo's work and Under the Influence Sharifa Rhodes-Pitts: The Cool World screening are also Harlem World contributor Yolande Brener's picks for the first weekend in February, 2011."
- Article by Jennifer M. Wood,Time Out New York, February 1, 2011

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  Harlem World
 
"It's the Dog That's Racist: Discovering the legend of White Dog"

"Racialicious' "Sexual Correspondent" Andrea (AJ) Plaid blogs about the Jan 21 screening of and discussion following White Dog presented by the ego trip collective: "...Exiting the theater that night, I noted the strange irony—and hope—of the series being housed in an indie theater located in the nexus of white-gentrifying Harlem. Perhaps this series is a good tonic, if not a great meeting point, for whites and the PoCs left in Harlem to gather to talk about the transitioning nabe and how well-off whites gentrifying it isn't simply viewed as a 'the neighborhood changing' so much as a blithe takeover, fortified by unaddressed white privilege, of a perceived spiritual and physical home of some Black people and our allies in the US and the world."
- By Andrea (AJ) Plaid, Racialicious blog, February 3, 2011

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  White DogRacialicious
 
"white dog / samuel fuller / 1982"

"when i saw the email from jeff mao: "ego trip Presents WHITE DOG @ Maysles Institute 2morrow Nite!" i couldn't believe it! what a combination! [...] what strikes me most is how relevant race remains and what i like about egotrip is their progressive, provocative approach to racism and the combination of egotrip and maysles is so perfect. perfect because the maysles' between their works and efforts promote dialogue and understanding and egotrip represents the pulse of today's pop culture [...]the discussion reignited a fire in me. [...] i paid the maysles suggested donation of $10 but the evening was priceless."
- by Nicole Nech, 'Nichole Nech: Justments from Motion Pictures, Music and Books' blog, January 22, 2011

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  White DogNicole Nelch
 

"Congo: My Country"

"When scheduling Lumumba on the fiftieth anniversary of the murder of that now-rehabilitated Congo/Zaïre leader, Maysles Cinema had not realized that January 17 would appropriately coincide with Martin Luther King Day. Cosponsored with Friends of the Congo, the Raoul Peck biopic had been featured two years ago in the theater's Congo in Harlem and, as noted in introductory remarks, is 'not one-hundred percent accurate.'" Review of Maysles Cinema's screening of Raul Peck's biopic Lumumba, by Donald Levit, Reel Talk - Movie Reviews, November 2010
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  Lumumba
 

"His Name is Albert Ayler"

"The New Yorker's film critic, Richard Brody, blogged about this screening - calling My Name is Albert Ayler "a superb jazz documentary—one not available on DVD."
-
Richard Brody, The New Yorker "Front Row" blog, Jan. 20, 2011
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"White Dog"

"The Village Voice's film critic, Jim Hoberman's "Voice Choice": "Filmed in headlines, framed as allegory, Sam Fuller's last great movie combines hard-boiled sentimentality and hysterical violence, sometimes in the same take"
- Jim Hoberman, The Village Voice, January 2011

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  White Dog
 

"Year in Film: Culture High"

"Maysles Cinema gets two mentions in this article about the multitude of venues and approaches to showing films in NYC, in spite of economic woes. From the article - "Livia Bloom, guest curator, Maysles Cinema: ...You could say that Maysles Cinema only has video projection, only has 50 seats, but that's an advantage for a lot of reasons. There are a lot of films that are only available digitally, and look better on that screen and in that setting."
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  Cinema
 

Edward O Bland's Cry of Jazz and Maysles Brother's Grey Gardens added to National Film Registry!

"Cry of Jazz, a lesser-known film we showed twice last year introduced once by film critic Armond White and once by Cry of Jazz director Edward O. Bland has made it into the National Film Registry (read an audience member review of the screening and Armond White led discussion here). Albert and David Maysles' 1976 documentary Grey Gardens, which is the centerpiece of our annual "Staunch!" Festival also made the list."
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  Cry of Jazz
 

"A Song for the Genius Child"

Review of Maysles Cinema's screening of Tamra Davis' documentary Jean-Michel Basquiat: The Radiant Child, by Donald Levit, Reel Talk - Movie Reviews, November 2010

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  Jean-Michel Basquiat
 

"Direct from the USSR"

"With introductions and Q&As by their major director-participants on two days, Maysles Cinema recently presented four rare short documentaries. Pioneer octogenarians DA Pennebaker and Albert Maysles reminisced and responded to questions during "The Thaw: Proto-Verity in the Soviet Union," a Malek Rasamny-Matt Peterson/Red Channels-Brecht Forum. The sessions touched on personal objectives and experiences, on technique and cinema history, and on politicians and plain folks during the brief window of pre-glasnost Cold War détente following Stalin's death..." - Donald Levit, Reel Talk - Movie Reviews, November 2010

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  Open Russia
 
 

"Bobbito Garcia's Playground B-Ball Film Festival:
Playground legends hit the big screen this past weekend."

"This past weekend, Harlem played host to a one of a kind film festival; one that was dedicated to playground basketball. The four-night event took viewers through some of the best films of streetball to ever be documented. NYC blacktop legend Bobbito Garcia aka Kool Bob Love was responsible for putting it all together...'"
- By Franklyn Calle, Slam Online: Your Source for the Best in Basketball, Nov. 3rd, 2010

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  Playground Basketball
   

"Where Ignorant Armies Clash "

"Eleven years old now and released in Europe in 2001, Africa in Pieces: The Tragedy of the Great Lakes/L'Afrique en Morceaux...has its first-ever American showing during documentary Maysles Cinema's second annual Congo in Harlem series. A following panel and Q&A featured the Egyptian-French director, Canadian law specialist and member of numerous human rights tribunals Luc Côté, and UN Congo consultant Jason Stearns..."

- Donald Levit, Reel Talk - Movie Reviews, October 2010
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  Africa In Pieces
 

"Marcus Samuelson's Harlem" - Red Rooster owner and Top Chef Masters winner's favorite Harlem Spots

"Harlem's creative side is on view at the edgy Maysles Cinema where films such as the recent Harlem Homegrown series are screened."
- Travel & Leisure, October 2010

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  Cinema
 

"Guerrilla Epic Battle of Chile, Back Onscreen at the Maysles"

"In the running for the most riveting and vital historical document ever put on celluloid, Patricio Guzmán's 1975–78 guerrilla epic The Battle of Chile, given three marathon screenings at the Maysles, is an unembedded, unfiltered political grenade that explodes anew this election season..."
- By Michael Atkinson, The Village Voice, Sept. 8, 2010

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  The Battle of Chile
 

"Animated Lives, Annotated Crimes: The Battle of Chile Marathon"

"Politically charged Third-World documentaries are a category unto themselves... during the 1970s, the form was at a fever pitch. Several hours long, the three-part "The Battle of Chile" is remarkable as it follows the events leading up to the coup d'état that brought down the democratically elected government of Salvador Allende on Sept. 11 1973, and the subsequent military dictatorship of General Augusto Pinoche. Commemorating what curator Liv Bloom calls "the other 9/11," the Maysles Institute revives Patricio Guzmán's electrifying piece of history-in-the-making, in which filmmaking truly becomes a guerrilla act."
- Steve Dollar, The Wall Street Journal, Sept. 9, 2010

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  The Battle of Chile
 

"Timeless comes to Harlem!!"

"Tools of War in conjunction with Maysles Cinema and Mochilla brings Timeless to Saint Nicholas Park in Harlem with help from VTech. Tuesday night in Harlem under looming rainy skies the Timeless Machine landed at the Tools of War Park Jam. Christie-Z and Tools of War have been bringing this amazing free event to parks all over New York for many years now. Giving people the opportunity to see hip-hop as it was originally done in the park. "

- VTech Phones
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  Timeless
 

"How to Get From Alabama to Harlem? Ride the Internet"

"The story of how the debut New York performance of the Huntsville, Ala., rap duo G-Side ended up in the basement rec room of a storefront movie house in Harlem can be traced back, in part, to some money changing hands at an Italian restaurant in the East Village several years ago. In between came the Internet of course — always the Internet — helping to shape this tale of how hip-hop moves in 2010.... "

- By Jon Caramanica, The New York Times
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"Q&A: Bertolain Elysee, Co-Curator of the Maysles Institute's "Country Rap 2: The Gulf States" Series"

"...Via e-mail, we spoke to co-curator Bertolain Elysee about the event's expansive intentions, why libertarians should love 2 Live Crew's Luke, and Lil Wayne and Lil Boosie's particular kind of political activism..."

- Brandon Soderberg, Sound of the City (Village Voice blog)

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"Black Is the Color"

"...Rain moved the free park event indoors, where Mount Morris Presbyterian Church proved perfect for the artist, born Eunice Kathleen Waymon...whose mother was a Methodist minister and who began in a church choir..."
- Donald Levit, Reel Talk Reviews

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  Nina Simone
 

"A Movie a Day, Day 60 - Nina Simone Great Performances: College Concerts and Interviews"

"...At one point, [Simone] tells Stroud that, even though her music is so firmly rooted in the political realities of her time and place, she thinks it's universal enough to live on after she's gone. If she could have seen her audience last night as they clapped, laughed, called out in response to things she said, and rose at the end for a standing ovation, she would have known she was right about that too.."
- Elise Nakhnikian, The House Next Door (Slant Magazine blog)

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  Nina Simone
 

"Muhammed and Albert"

"Probably the best part of the evening for me was getting to chat with Maysles before he screened his movie, then hearing him talk about his humanist, unpretentious way of making documentaries during the Q and A. "
- Elise Nakhnikian, Girls Can Play, April 18, 2010

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"Documentaries Go in Bloom and Under the Knife"

Filmmaker Magazine says, "Livia Bloom has assembled a fascinating program this week comprised of three rarely shown films all dealing with plastic surgery and the construction of beauty. The centerpiece is Mitch McCabe's feature Youth Knows No Pain...definitely recommended."

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Daisy: Story of a Facelift
 
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