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MAYSLES CINEMA: CALENDAR / CONGO IN HARLEM
DIRECTED BY JESSICA GREEN
 
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Union Square Awards
Support provided in part by the Union Square Awards, a project of the Tides Center,

NYSCA

The New York State Council on the Arts,

Union Square Awards
and public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.
 

Congo In Harlem
 


Congo in Harlem is an annual week-long series of film screenings accompanied by special events, panel discussions, performances, and receptions. Congo in Harlem will provide audiences with more than the traditional movie-going experience -- it will offer opportunities to discover Congolese culture, learn about the ongoing humanitarian crisis, engage in dialogue, and get involved.

The box office is open for advance ticket purchases Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, & Friday, 12 - 6 pm, and one hour before the start of all events until they end. If the door is locked during these hours, knock on the store front window. Ticket-holders arriving 15 minutes before showtime are guaranteed a seat inside the theater. Overflow seating available for sold out shows.
Tickets $10 suggested donation, unless otherwise noted.
Members only: Reserve your seat at reservations@mayslesinstitute.org
Become a member>
Wheelchair Accessibility:Our Cinema and one of our restrooms are handicap accessible. Feel free to call the Box Office at (212) 537-6843 if you have any additional questions or concerns.

 

OCTOBER 2012
 
Congo in Harlem 4
La Congolaise by Gilson Katoko

Congo in Harlem 4
Artwork by Justin Kasereka


Congo in Harlem 4
Photography by Emily Cavan Lynch

Series Pass Available Here>
Buy Tickets
Congo in Harlem 4

Friday, October 12th - Sunday, October 21st, 2012


Congo in Harlem 4 is the fourth annual series of Congo-related films and events at the Maysles Cinema in Harlem. Congo in Harlem showcases innovative work that celebrates Congolese culture, raises awareness about the Democratic Republic of Congo's challenges, provokes dialogue, and encourages community engagement.

This year's series highlights a wide selection of films by Congolese and international directors, ranging from political exposés to personal journeys, historical inquiries, artistic provocations, and groundbreaking animation. Many screenings will be followed by a discussion with the filmmaker.

In addition to the films, Congo in Harlem 4 will present a special off-site panel discussion at the New York Society for Ethical Culture, "KONY 2012: Lessons for Congo," exploring the implications of Invisible Children's KONY 2012 video campaign for DR Congo, as well as live musical performances by Congolese rapper Alesh, DJ Clive Bean, Philadelphia-based Congolese singer Rafiya, and New York's own Isaac Katalay. The Maysles Cinema lobby and community space will showcase artwork by Goma's Justin Kasereka, digital photographs by TIME Magazine photographer Michael Christopher Brown, and the photographic exhibition "I'm Still Here" by Emily Cavan Lynch
 
Congo in Harlem 4 is a volunteer-run, non-profit series produced by Maysles Cinema, True-Walker Productions, and Friends of the Congo. It is made possible by the generous support of DISH Africa TV, Cultures of Resistance Network, V-DAY, and Panzi Foundation USA.

Screenings are open to the public at a suggested donation of $10. Box office opens 1 hour prior to show time and advance tickets are available through Brown Paper tickets (see links in event descriptions below). A special group discount is available for the purchase of 5 or more tickets to any screening. Series passes are $50.

Proceeds from Congo in Harlem will be contributed to a fund supporting emerging Congolese filmmakers

Series Partners and Friends: Cinereach, Congo Leadership Initiative, Cultures of Resistance, DISH Africa TV, French Institute Alliance Française - FIAF, Elokomasi, HEAL Africa, Man-Up, Mutaani FM, The New York African Film Festival, New York Film/Video CouncilNomadicWax, Now AfriCAN, Panzi Foundation USA, Tabilulu Productions, V-DAY, V-DAY - Harlem, Women's International League for Peace and Freedom - NY Metro Branch, Yole!Africa, WBAI Radio, WITNESS.

Media Sponsors: Applause Africa, Face2Face Africa, WBAI Radio.

Seating is limited and available on a first come first served basis. We recommend arriving 30 minutes before event's start time to secure a seat in the main screening room.

Contact: congoinharlem@gmail.com or call (212) 537-6843
Congo in Harlem 4 is dedicated to the memory of
Lyn Lusi
(co-founder of HEAL Africa) and Veronique Tudieshe (Activist and Congo in Harlem volunteer)
     
 
Friday,
Oct. 19th,
  Congo in Harlem 4

 
White Elephant


Atalaku

Isaac Katalay

Rafiya
7:30 pm
Buy Tickets
  White Elephant
Dir. Kristof Bilsen, 2011, 35 min.
In French and Lingala with English subtitles

Somebody passed by one day: "Mama, does the Post really work? If I leave this letter with you, will it ever arrive?" I told him: "of course it will."  He started laughing. "I know for sure it will never reach its destination." White Elephant depicts Congo's central post office and its employees. The postal system, a grandiose relic of Congo's colonial past, has trapped its employees in a Kafkaesque time warp. From the minutia of leaky ceilings and cracked walls to the employees' grand dreams for escape, Bilsen captures a vivid snapshot of life in present day Congo.


Atalaku
Special Work-in-Progress Screening
Dir. Dieudonne Hamadi, 2012. 62 min.
In French and Lingala with English subtitles

Atalaku offers an insider view into Congo's 2011 presidential elections. Gaylor, a struggling pastor, has sold his services to the highest paying candidate. As Gaylor attempts to mobilize voters in Kinshasa's gritty streets, filmmaker Dieudonne Hamadi's lens is in the fray, never missing a beat. The atmosphere is charged, and Gaylor comes face to face with the Congolese people's discontent. When elections finally do arrive, the nation's vast poverty besieges the polls, plunging a suspect electoral process into chaos.


Screening followed by discussion with filmmakers Kristof Bilsen and Dieudonne Hamadi + Reception with live music by Isaac Katalay and Rafiya.

Performer Bios:

Isaac Katalay - Born in Kinshasa, the capital city of the Democratic Republic of Congo, and now living in New York City, Isaac Katalay's music represents the blending of two worlds. For the past two decades, Isaac has worked as an ensemble musician, choreographer, dancer, and speaker. His style is a distinctive blend of contemporary and traditional Congolese dance moves and aesthetics, which he calls "contemptra". Isaac is also founder of the "Life Long Project" and co-founder of the "Karibu" movement, both of which promote Congolese music and culture in the US.

Rafiya - Born in Los Angeles to Congolese parents, Rafiya writes and sings about the human experience. She has worked with Oscar Kidjo, recored in Youssou N'Dour's studio, and toured France and North Africa with French rap star Mokobe. In 2010 she released her debut album "Amazing" to great acclaim, and this year, she premiered her new single "Where I'm From," an ode to Africa and being African.

 
Saturday,
Oct. 20th,
  Congo in Harlem 4  


Petna Katondolo



Teen Producers Academy






11:00 am -
3:00 pm

CLOSED EVENT


 
Filmmaker Exchange

with Petna Katondolo, Yole!Africa, and the Maysles Institute's Filmmakers Collaborative for Adults and Teen Producers Academy

***THIS IS A CLOSED EVENT -- OPEN TO MAYSLES EDUCATION PROGRAMS ONLY***


Filmmaker and founder of Yole!Africa, Petna Ndaliko Katondolo, will lead a master-class for members of the Maysles Filmmakers Collaborative for Adults. He will show an excerpt from from his forthcoming documentary about Congolese boxer Kibomango, and discuss funding, development, and filmmaker/subject relationships. There will also be a Skype exchange between youth filmmakers from Yole!Africa in Goma, and the Teen Producers Academy at the Maysles Institute. The discussion will focus on four short films made by the filmmakers at Yole!Africa—Iron Eagle, Leadership at University of Goma, Makayabo in Goma, and Peoples' Beach—and the film Triggering Wounds, made by the Maysles Institute's Teen Producers Academy.

Although the exchange is not open to the public, the films are - watch below:





 
Saturday,
Oct. 20th,
  Congo in Harlem 4
Co-Presented by the New York Film and Video Council
 


Films by Jean Michel Kibushi

Alesh


Isaac Katalay

7:30 pm
Buy Tickets
 
Animation by Jean Michel Kibushi

Dir. Jean Michel Kibushi, 70 min.
In French with English subtitles
Using a magical blend of drawings, cutouts, models, and claymation, Jean Michel Kibushi summons a collective vision of Congo, past and present. For his subject matter, Kibushi draws on traditional Congolese folktales, social struggle, and political history. Each film is a mini-world unto itself, sprung forth from Kibushi's brilliant imagination to celebrate Congo's rich local culture and offer socio-political critique. Due to Kibushi's focus on his work in Congo, these films have rarely been screened in the US, and we are honored to present them at Congo in Harlem.


Screening followed by reception featuring musical performances by Alesh and Isaac Katalay.


Performer Bios:  

Alesh - Hailing from Kisangani, and currently based in Kinshasa, Alesh is a committed rapper and rising star in Congo's hip hop scene. Alesh's debut album, Mort Dans L'ame (2010), is a hard-hitting fusion of hip-hop, rock, folk, and Ndomblo (Congolese pop), which has earned him numerous awards and recognitions. In 2011, he teamed up with Nomadic Wax to release the music video "Reveil: The Awakening". This bold song spoke truth to corruption during the 2011 presidential elections, and was subsequently banned throughout Congo. He is currently in the US to perform on the OneBeat Tour and complete his second album, African (R)evolution, with Nomadic Wax.

Isaac Katalay - Born in Kinshasa, the capital city of the Democratic Republic of Congo, and now living in New York City, Isaac Katalay's music represents the blending of two worlds. For the past two decades, Isaac has worked as an ensemble musician, choreographer, dancer, and speaker. His style is a distinctive blend of contemporary and traditional Congolese dance moves and aesthetics, which he calls "contemptra". Isaac is also founder of the "Life Long Project" and co-founder of the "Karibu" movement, both of which promote Congolese music and culture in the US.



 
Sunday,
Oct. 21st, 10:00 am
  Congo in Harlem 4 and Film Voyagers
Film Voyagers is a Maysles Cinema program of films catered towards younger children ages 3 to 7, and their parents. Priority admission for Maysles Cinema Family Members to Film Voyagers programs, and $8 suggested donation for non-members. Become a member>

 

Jean Michel Kibushi
Buy Tickets

Tickets $8
 
*Special Children's Program*
Film Voyagers: Congo

Dir. Jean Michel Kibushi, 60 min.
In French with English subtitles read by professional actors

A selection of Jean Michel Kibushi's animations intended for children aged 3-7. This screening is being offered as part of Maysles Cinema's Film Voyagers series, a weekly film program for young children. All subtitles will be read aloud by professional actors. It'll be a fun morning in a cozy theater with complimentary organic popcorn.
 
Sunday,
Oct. 21st,
  Congo in Harlem 4

 

Ota Benga

3:00 pm
Buy Tickets
  Ota Benga
Dir. Alfeu França, 2002, 16 min.
Ota Benga was a pygmy who was brought from the Belgian Congo to the US to be exhibited in the 1904 World's Fair. França presents Ota Benga's tragic story to a haunting stream of archival images and animation, offering a cautionary tale of colonial-era racism and exploitation.

Boma Turvuren: The Voyage
Dir. Francis Dujardin, 1999, 84 min.
In 1897, 267 Congolese were brought to Brussels for the World's Fair. Subjected to the crushing gaze of the whites and the cold climate, many fell to disease and some lost their lives. One hundred years later, Congolese scholars return to the scene, revisiting a legacy of stereotypes and mistreatment, prompting the question "How is today different?"
 
CONGO IN HARLEM - PAST SCREENINGS:

October2009




CONGO IN HARLEM 1
OCTOBER 1-24, 2009
Series Programmers: Louis Abelman, Baze Mpinja, Lynn True, Nelson Walker

The conflict raging in Democratic Republic of Congo is the deadliest humanitarian crisis since World War II. It has taken nearly 6 million lives since 1996, most of them women and children. But despite the vast human toll, most Americans are still unfamiliar with the conflict, and even less so with Congo's vibrant culture and traditions

Digital slideshows of two exhibits will be projected in the cinema's community spaces: A Congo Chronicle: Lumumba in Urban Art (courtesy of the Museum for African Art) and Congo/Women: Portraits of War (courtesy of Art Works Projects and ESB Institute).

Plus two photo exhibits in the cinema gallery:

- North Kivu: Democratic Republic of Congo Photographs by the filmmakers of the Goma Film Project. Sales benefit Congo in Harlem and the Goma Film Project. See the photographs>

- Congo: The Forgotten War Photos from the DRC by award winning photojournalist Ron Haviv

Series Partners: Friends of the Congo, Heal Africa, Human Rights Watch Film Festival, V-Day, Yole!Africa, Georges Malaika Foundation, Museum for African Art, ENOUGH Project, Congo Global Action Network, Witness, Art Works Projects, Ellen Stone Belic Institute for the Study of Women and Gender in the Arts and Media at Columbia College Chicago, Tabilulu Productions, Zeitgeist Films, Harlem Vintage and Nectar Wine Bar.

Suggested Admission: $10. Box office opens 1 hour before show time. Limited reservations available - email reservations@mayslesinstitute.org or call (212)582-6050 ext 207 at least one day before the screening.

Thursday,   
Oct. 1
7:30 pm






 

Soul Power
Dir. Jeffrey Levi-Hinte, 2009, 93min.
Soul Power
documents the Zaire 74 music festival that accompanied the "Rumble in the Jungle" heavyweight boxing championship match between Muhammad Ali and George Foreman in October 1974.

Panel discussion with Maurice Carney (Friends of the Congo), Lubangi Muniania (Tabilulu Productions), author Yaa-Lengi Ngemi and Ken Braun (Sterns Music USA, compiler of Franco Phonic) to follow screening.

 

Friday,   
Oct. 2
7:30 pm






 

Lumumba
Dir. Raoul Peck, 2000, 100min.
The true story of the rise to power and brutal assassination of the formerly vilified and later redeemed leader of independent Congo, Patrice Lumumba.

Panel discussion with author Yaa-Lengi Ngemi and activist Kambale Musavuli, and art critic/educator Lubangi Muniania to follow screening + opening night reception featuring poetry by Omekongo Dibinga.

Co-Presented by Human Rights Watch Film Festival, Museum for African Art, Zeitgeist Films

 

Saturday,   
Oct. 3
7:30 pm






 

Yole!Africa Program
Dir. Petna Katondolo, 60 min.
Three short films (Lamokowang, True Story, and Intervention Rapide) by Petna Katondolo made in conjunction with Yole!Africa, a local community arts organization based in Goma, DR Congo.


Discussion with director Petna Katondolo moderated by Nita Evele & reception to follow screening.

Co-Presented by Yole!Africa, Congo Global Action, ENOUGH Project

 

Thursday,   
Oct. 8
7:30 pm






 

Pieces d'Identite
Dir. Mweze Ngangura, 1998, 93min.

A Congolese king arrives Brussels in search of his long-lost daughter. What masquerades as a simple fable raises some of the most troubling issues of identity facing people of African descent in the ever-widening Diaspora of the late 20th century.
Discussion with Professor Joseph Mwantuali (Hamilton College) and author Yaa-Lengi Ngemi & reception to follow screening.

Co-Presented by Friends of the Congo

 

Friday,     
Oct. 9
7:30 pm






 

Congo: White King, Red Rubber, Black Death
Dir. Peter Bate, 2003, 84 min.
A harrowing investigation of how King Leopold II of Belgium acquired Congo as a colony and exploited it by reign of terror.

Dan Rather Reports: All Mine
Dir. Andrew Glazer, HD Net, 2009, 32 min.
When an American company bought a massive copper mine from the government of DR Congo, it also took control of part of the impoverished country's economic future. Critics say the contract for the billion-dollar mine left the war-torn African nation with little in return, and the US government played a part in what many are describing as a modern day land grab. Featuring Professor Peter Rosenblum (Columbia University Law School).

Discussion with Professor Peter Rosenblum, Jason Stearns (former UN investigator), and attorney/activist Joseph Mbangu, moderated by Maurice Carney (Friends of the Congo) to follow screening.

Co-Presented by Yatt Ndindory Video

 

Saturday,   
Oct. 10
7:30 pm






 

Lumo
Filmmakers: Bent-Jorgen Perlmutt, Nelson Walker, Lynn True, Louis Abelman, 2007, 72min.
An intimate portrait of Lumo Sinai, a young Congolese woman on an uncertain road to recovery at a unique hospital for rape survivors.

Panel discussion with filmmakers, Carrie Crawford (Director, Friends of the Congo), and Hon. Dr. Kasereka “Jo” Lusi and Lyn Lusi, founders of HEAL Africa Hospital to follow screening & reception featuring poetry by Toni Blackman.

Co-presented by Human Rights Watch Film Festival and Heal Africa

 

Friday,   
Oct. 16
6:30 pm






 

Ndunga Procession

The tradition of African masquerade is used for many purposes one of which is healing. The Ndunga Project is based on “Ndunga” the Congolese masquerade that appears in ceremonies to warn the villagers of injustices against themselves or towards others. The word “Ndunga” loosely translates to “Justifier” in English, pronounced N-dunga.

Gathering and procession from the Ndunga Public Art Project will begin at 6:30pm with designer Sandra Am Bell at the Harlem State Office Building located at 163 W. 125th Street at the corner of Adam Clayton Boulevard. Procession will end at the Maysles Cinema before showtime.

 
Friday,   
Oct. 16
7:30 pm
 

The Greatest Silence: Rape in Congo
Dir. Lisa F. Jackson, 2007, 76min.
Violence against women in conflict has been called one of history's greatest silences. This documentary, filmed in the war zones of the Democratic Republic of Congo over several months in 2006 and 2007, breaks the silence that has surrounded the tens of thousands of women and girls who have been kidnapped, raped, sexually enslaved and tortured in that country's intractable civil war.

Following the screening, a discussion with attorney/activist Joseph Mbangu, Aningina Tshefu Bibiane (Women's International League for Peace and Freedom), Sandra AM Bell (designer, Ndunga Public Art Project) and others TBD.

Co-presented by the Friends of the Congo

 
Sunday,   
Oct. 18
7:00 pm
 

Mobutu, King of Zaire
Dir. Thierry Michel, 1999, 135 min.
Following two years of investigation, this documentary charts the amazing life Congo's eponymous dictator, Mobutu Sese Seko.

Reception sponsored by Awale Restaurant to follow screening.

Co-presented by the Friends of the Congo

 
Monday,    
Oct. 19
7:30 pm
 

Women in War Zones
Dir. Scott Blanding and Brad LaBriola, 2009, 51min.
A touching look into the lives of two young women who become sisters as they recover from sexual violence at Panzi Hospital.

Panel discussion with filmmakers Brad LaBriola & Greg Heller, Eve Ensler (V-Day) and author Yaa-lengi Ngemi, Aningina Tshefu Bibiane (Women's International League for Peace and Freedom), moderated by journalist Jimmie Briggs. Reception sponsored by Sylvia's Restaurant to follow screening

Co-Presented by V-Day

 
Tuesday,   
Oct. 20
7:30 pm
 

African Pygmy Thrills
Dir. Eugene W. Castle, 1930s, 10min.
An amazing study of a pygmy community building a vine-bridge 50 feet above a crocodile infested river. Warner Herzog cites this film as the impetus for embarking on a career in film.

Matamata & Pilipili
Dir. Tristan Bourland, 1997, 58 min.
A rare glimpse at some of the earliest films shot in Congo, revealing the complex terrain of colonial relationships, media representations, and popular culture.

  African Pygmy Thrills
Wednesday,
Oct. 21
7:30 pm
 

Afro@Digital
Dir. Balufu Bakupa-Kanyinda, 2003, 52 min.
An exploration of how digital technology is changing the landscape of African art and culture, and how it can be used to serve the interest of Africa at large.

Article 15a
Dir. Balufu Bakupa-Kanyinda, 1999, 15 minutes

We Too Walked on the Moon
Dir. Balufu Bakupa-Kanyinda, 2009, 16 min.

Panel discussion with director Balufu Bakupa-Kanyinda, Richard Pena (Program Director, Film Society of Lincoln Center) and Lubangi Muniania (Tabilulu Productions) to follow screening.

 
Thursday,  
Oct. 22
7:30 pm
 

Jupiter's Dance
Dir. Renaud Barret and Florent de La Tullaye, 2006, 73 min.
An exhilarating jaunt through the streets of Kinshasa to meet musicians who struggle to emerge from the chaos. Jupiter, the charismatic leader of the band Okwess International, serves as the film's guide as he describes his city and his long battle to break out of the ghetto with his music.

Les Vulnerables
Dir. Bent-Jorgen Perlmutt, 2007, 14 min.
A coming of age story about a schoolboy who tries to prove his manhood to his wheelchair-bound father by helping him smuggle goods over the border between Congo and Rwanda.

  Les Vulnerables
Friday,  
Oct. 23
7:30 pm
 

La Vie Est Belle (Life is Rosy)
Dir. Mweze Ngangura and Benoit Lamy, 1987, 80 min.
Legendary Congolese musician Papa Wemba plays a poor country boy with music in his heart and big dreams. He travels to the city, where he falls in love with second wife of a prominent club owner. Can he win her hand and fulfill his dreams of being as singer?

Discussion with Professor Joseph Mwantuali (Hamilton College) and Angele Makombo (UN Dept. of Political Affairs) to follow screening.

Reception sponsored by Awale Restaurant with special performance by Simon Kashama.

Co-presented by the Georges Malaika Foundation

 
Saturday,   
Oct. 24
3 pm
 

Micro City: An Educational Campus in the Democratic Republic of Congo
A presentation and panel by advanced students of architecture at Columbia University. The students recently traveled to the Katanga province in southern DR Congo to gather information for the design of a secondary school campus, community college, and teacher's campus. Students will share their experiences, insights and preliminary design ideas.

 
Saturday,   
Oct. 24
6:30 pm
 

Ndunga Procession

The tradition of African masquerade is used for many purposes one of which is healing. The Ndunga Project is based on “Ndunga” the Congolese masquerade that appears in ceremonies to warn the villagers of injustices against themselves or towards others. The word “Ndunga” loosely translates to “Justifier” in English, pronounced N-dunga.

Gathering and procession from the Ndunga Public Art Project will begin at 6:30pm with designer Sandra Bell at the Harlem State Office Building located at 163 W. 125th Street at the corner of Adam Clayton Boulevard. Procession will end at the Maysles Cinema before showtime. Procession will end at the Maysles Cinema before showtime.

 
Saturday,   
Oct. 24
7:30 pm
 

A Duty to Protect
Dir. Witness, 2005, 14 min.
The widespread recruitment and use of child solders in the Democratic Republic of Congo is unparalleled throughout Africa -- tens of thousands of children have been recruited as combatants in the current conflict. A Duty to Protect advocates for an end to the impunity in Congo and accountability for the crimes committed against children.

Reporter
Dir. Eric Daniel Metzgar, 2009, 90min.
Reporter Nicholas Kristof travels to the Democratic Republic of Congo to investigate the growing humanitarian crisis.

Panel discussion featuring director Eric Daniel Metzgar, Mohamed Keita (Committee to Protect Journalists), journalist Makeda Crane, Sasha Lezhnev (ENOUGH Project) and Bukeni Waruzi (Witness) to follow screening. Closing night reception featuring a musical performance by Deja Belle.

Co-presented by Witness and ENOUGH project

  Reporter


Painting by JP Mika, courtesy of the Horvath collection



Congo in Harlem 2
October 8th - October 23rd

   Congo in Harlem 2 is the second annual series of Congo-related films and events at the Maysles Cinema in Harlem. This year's program showcases a wide range of films by Congolese and international directors, representing the most important issues facing the Democratic Republic of Congo today. Most screenings will be followed by panel discussions, special events, musical performances, and receptions. Congo in Harlem 2 will provide audiences with more than the traditional movie-going experience -- it will offer opportunities to celebrate Congolese culture, learn about the ongoing humanitarian crisis, engage in dialogue, and get involved.

Highlights of the program include: October 8th and 9th, Monique Mbeka Phoba, a Belgian-based Congolese filmmaker, will present her films A Bewitched Life and Between the Cup and the Elections. On October 17th, we will kick off Break the Silence: Congo Week with a special screening by Cultures of Resistance and a tribute to legendary soukous singer Kanda Bongo Man, who will be attendance. On October 23rd, there will be an engaging panel discussion focused on solutions to the child soldier problem, featuring Ishmael Beah (author of A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier) and Jimmie Briggs (author of Innocents Lost: When Child Soldiers Go to War). The closing night film will be Thierry Michel's expose of mining operations in Congo, Katanga Business, followed by a panel with Peter Rosenblum (Professor of Human Rights Law, Columbia University) and other special guests. Please visit our website for the latest updates and schedule additions.

Special exhibit in cinema lobby: Photographs from North Kivu, DRC by Robert Garner and Mary McFarland.

Congo in Harlem 2
is supported by VDAY, the Caipirinha Foundation, and other organizations. Ticket will be sold on the basis of suggested donation and the proceeds from each event will be contributed to NGOs and organizations working in Congo.

Series Partners: Friends of the Congo, Now AfriCAN, Tabilulu Productions, V-Day, Cultures of Resistance, The New York African Film Festival, HEAL Africa, The Human Rights Watch Film Festival, Icarus Films, Congo Global Action, Museum for African Art, Yole!Africa, Man Up Campaign, Hirondelle USA, Radio Okapi, and Africa.com.

Take Action -- Bring a used cellphone to be recycled and receive a free gift!

Friday,  
Oct. 8
7:30 pm



 

A Bewitched Life
Dir. Monique Mbeka Phoba, 2004, 52 min
Monique Mbeka Phoba, the director of the film, spent part of her childhood in Zaire (DR Congo), where witchcraft plays an integral role in people's lives. After moving to Belgium, she lost touch with this aspect of her culture, in part because her parents kept her away from it, even though they were believers themselves. Phoba emabarks on a journey back to her roots, guided by an 84-year old man accused of being a witch in his childhood. Through frank discussions between Phoba and those close to her, the film follows the rhythms of its maker's search to find the meaning of witchcraft in Congo.

AFTER THE SCREENING:
Discussion with director Monique Mbeka Phoba, moderated by Mahen Bonetti (Executive Director of The New York African Film Festival) and opening night reception featuring music by Isaac Katalay and sponsored by Harlem's own Sugar Hill Ale.


Evening Co-Presented by The New York African Film Festival and V-Day

  A Bewitched Life
performer Isaac Katalay

Saturday,  
Oct. 9
7:30 pm



 

Between the Cup and the Election
Dir. Monique Mbeka Phoba and Guy Kabeya Muya, 2008, 56 min
Inspired by the 2006 elections in Congo, a group of film students sets out to make a film. They track down members of the 1974 Leopards, Zaire's national soccer squad, the first team from sub-Saharan Africa to qualify for the World Cup. After a dismal first round performance -- the Leopards were outscored 14-0 in three games -- the players returned home in disgrace and drifted into obscurity. The team's captain, however, has fared better and is running for political office in Kinshasa. Deftly weaving past and present, Between the Cup and the Election offers a personal and endearing study of the intersection between sport and politics.

AFTER THE SCREENING:
Discussion with director Monique Mbeka Phoba, moderated by Jimmie Briggs (journalist, Congo activist, and author of Innocents Lost: When Child Soldiers Go to War) and reception.


Evening Co-Presented by V-Day

 

Sunday,  
Oct. 17
7:00 pm



 

Congo Week Kick-Off!

Cultures of Resistance: Congo Week
Dir. Iara Lee, 2010, 4min.
A short film about Friends of the Congo and their efforts to raise consciousness about the situation and support Congolese institutions working for peace. Special Performance: IMPACT Repertory Theatre IMPACT Repertory Theatre, an Oscar nominated youth performance group, will be giving a special Congo Week performance in collaboration with Friends of the Congo.

Special Performance: IMPACT Repertory Theatre
IMPACT Repertory Theatre, an Oscar nominated youth performance group, will be giving a special Congo Week performance in collaboration with Friends of the Congo.

An Evening with Kanda Bongo Man
A sneak peak at a new documentary about popular soukous singer Kanda Bongo Man, along with a short selection of music videos and interviews. Kanda Bongo Man will be in attendance, along with Lubangi Muniania, founder of Tabilulu Productions, the record label that released Kanda's latest album, Non-Stop Feeling.

AFTER THE SCREENING:
Discussion with Kanda Bongo Man and Lubangi Muniania (founder of Tabilulu Productions) & Congo Week Kick-Off Reception


Evening Co-Presented by Cultures of Resistance, Tabilulu Productions, and Friends of the Congo

 

Impact Repertory Theatre

Kanda Bongo Man

Monday,  
Oct. 18
7:30 pm

 

Congo in Four acts
Dir. Kiripi Katembo Siku, Dieudo Hamadi, Patrick Ken Kalala, Davita Wa Lusala, 2010, 69min.
Four short films made by Congolese filmmakers who set out to create an alternative to the snapshots of horror and desperation that have come to characterize their country.

  Ladies in Waiting
  Directed by Dieudo Hamadi & Divita Wa Lusala
An embattled hospital manager negotiates collateral with a group of new mothers being held at the hospital until they can pay their medical bills.

  Symphony Kinshasa
  Directed by Kiripi Katembo Siku
Siku takes a poetic, unflinching eye to the streets of Kinshasa, Congo's capitol. Stagnant puddles, heaps of trash, and bare electrical wires expose the city's imploding infrastructure and absence of public services.

  Zero Tolerance
  Directed by Dieudo Hamadi
A Congolese policewoman, who is head of the Sexual Violence Unit, questions two boys accused of attacking and raping a woman on her way home from the market. Her efforts to mediate between the young perpetrators and their victim reveal both the depth of the problem and the community's resolve to address it.

  After the Mine
  Directed by Kiripi Katembo Siku
Siku examines Kibushi, a polluted mining town where even the youngest children are enlisted to extract the nation's wealth. The devastating conditions have trapped those who are living there, and this film tells their stories.

AFTER THE SCREENING:
Discussion with Joseph Mbangu (Congolese attorney and activist), Sylvie Muanga Mbanga (Congolese human rights lawyer and women's rights advocate).

Co-presented by Icarus Films

 
Ladies in Waiting


Symphony Kinshasa


After The Mine

Tuesday,  
Oct. 19
7:30 pm


 

State of Mind: Healing Trauma
Dir. Djo Munga, 2010, 52min.
Is healing possible for individuals living in a country where over 5 million people have died? Director Djo Munga takes this question on by following Albert Pesso, a trained dancer who has developed a trademarked method for healing trauma called PBSP (Pesso Boyden System Psychomotor). With support from the German government, Pesso travels to Congo to train health care practitioners in his method. Mungo observes the proceedings with patience and honesty, delicately revealing the deep and complex roots of the challenge at hand.

AFTER THE SCREENING:
Discussion with psychologist Dr. Mark A. Bolden (Eastern Regional Representative for the Association of Black Psychologists and co-founder of the Fanon Project - a cadre of scholars dedicated to decolonizing the African mind and healing African people traumatized by political violence) and Dr. Matt Fried (psychologist and a certified practitioner of PBSP who was involved with the project depicted in the film).

Co-presented by Icarus Films

 

Wednesday,  
Oct. 20
7:30 pm


 

Jazz Mama
Dir. Petna Katondolo, 2010, 30min.
How do you talk about rape in a place where basic human rights are systematically violated? Katondolo skirts the boundaries of reality and fiction, offering a compelling portrait of Conoglese women who stand strong in their communities and denounce the violence they experience.

Weapon of War
Dir. Isle and Femke Van Velzen, 2009, 59min.
Two soldiers attempt to reconcile with their past, unveiling a seldom seen side of the brutal use of rape in DR Congo's conflict. One soldier meets his victim in an attempt to ask her forgiveness. The other, now a priest in Congo's army, confronts perpetrators and urges them to change, just as he did.

AFTER THE SCREENING:
Discussion with Dr. Roger Luhiriri (human rights advocate and former fistula doctor at Panzi Hospital), Jocelyn Kelly (gender-based violence Research Coordinator with the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative) and Dr. Lee Ann De Reus (President of the Board of Directors of Panzi Hospital Foundation).


Evening Co-Presented by the Man Up Campaign

 
Jazz Mama


Director Petna Katondolo

Thursday,  
Oct. 21
7:30 pm


 

Le Clandestin / The Stowaway
Dir. Zéka Laplaine, 1996, 15min
An African stowaway attempts to elude a tenacious police officer in a short burlesque film that sets the serious issue of illegal immigration against a comic backdrop.

Pushing the Elephant
Dir. Beth Davenport and Elizabeth Mandel, 2010, 91min.
"An intimate family drama set against the backdrop of the 1998 conflict in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Pushing the Elephant tells the story of Rose Mapendo, who was separated during the conflict from her five-year-old daughter, Nangabire. Rose survived the atrocities of those years and was eventually resettled in Phoenix, Arizona, with her other children. Now, after 12 years apart, Rose and her daughter Nangabire are reunited in the US. Through the story of their reunion, we come to understand the excruciating decisions Rose made in order to survive and the complex difficulties Nangabire faces as a refugee in the US—torn between her painful past and a hopeful future." - Human Rights Watch Film Festival


AFTER THE SCREENING:
Discussion with Directors Beth Davenport and Liz Mandel and other special guests & reception.

Co-Presented by Arts Engine and The Human Rights Watch Film Festival

 

Le Clandestin


Friday,  
Oct. 22
7:30 pm


 

L'Afrique En Morceaux / "The Tragedy of the Great Lakes"
Dir. Jihan El-Tahri, 2001, 100min.
A chronicle of DR Congo from 1994-2000, filmed at the height of the Second Congo War. With astonishing access to key political and military players in the conflict -- including Kabila, Kagame, Musaveni, and Kabarebe -- El-Tahri has created an essential historical document that remains as relevant today as it was nearly a decade ago. Africa in Pieces served as an important reference in the recently leaked UN mapping report, and it's screening at Congo in Harlem will be the film's first public showing in the US.

AFTER THE SCREENING:
Discussion with director Jihan El-Tahri, Jason Stearns (Congo researcher/analyst, former UN investigator) and Luc Côté (Lead investigator/writer of the UN mapping report), moderated by Samar Al-Bulushi (Congo researcher) & reception

Co-Presented by The New York African Film Festival, Hirondelle, USA, and Radio Okapi

 

Saturday,  
Oct. 23
2:00 pm


 

***Special Panel***
Child Soldiers and Youth Leadership

A panel discussion about how youth leadership and entrepreneurship can have a positive impact on the lives of former child soldiers and young people affected by war. Confirmed speakers include Ishmael Beah (author A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier) and Jimmie Briggs (author Innocents Lost: When Child Soldiers Go to War), and Kambale Musavuli (student coordinator and spokesperson for Friends of the Congo). Moderated by Priscillia Kounkou Hoveyda, co-founder of Now AfriCAN.

Co-Presented by Now AfriCAN

 

Author Ishmael Beah

Author Jimmie Briggs

Kambale Musavali, Friends of the Congo

Saturday,  
Oct. 23
7:00 pm


 

Katanga Business
Dir. Thierry Michel, 2009, 120min.
Set in one of the world's richest mining regions, Katanga Business is a riveting political and economic thriller that exposes some of the key actors in the scramble for Congo's natural wealth. The impoverished residents of Katanga are pitted against a motley collection of individuals and multinationals all vying for a piece of the action, including a Belgian entrepreneur known as "The King of Katanga", a Canadian CEO attempting to save an obsolete, state-run mine from bankruptcy; a Chinese businessman who just signed the mining contract of the century with the Congolese government; and a wealthy provincial governor, praised by the masses, who struggles to keep the situation from imploding.

AFTER THE SCREENING:
PPanel discussion with Peter Rosenblum (Professor of Human Rights Law at Columbia University), Howard French (Senior Correspondent with The New York Times and Associate Professor at Columbia University School of Journalism), and Mvemba Phizo Dizolele (writer, foreign policy analyst and independent journalist) & closing night reception.


Co-Presented by Hirondelle, USA, and Radio Okapi

 
October2011


Congo in Harlem 3
Friends of the Congo, True-Walker Productions, and Maysles Cinema Present
Congo in Harlem 3

October 16 - 23, 2011

Congo in Harlem 3 is the third annual series of Congo-related films and special events at the Maysles Cinema in Harlem. This year's program features a wide range of films by Congolese and international directors, representing some of the most important issues facing the Democratic Republic of Congo today. Most screenings will be followed by panel discussions, special events, musical performances, and receptions. Congo in Harlem 3 will provide audiences with more than the traditional movie-going experience -- it will offer opportunities to celebrate Congolese culture, learn about the ongoing humanitarian crisis, engage in dialogue, and get involved.

A critical focus of this year's program will be the upcoming 2011 presidential elections in Congo, scheduled to take place in late November. Key issues will be addressed in panel discussions and post-screening Q&As.

Highlights of the program include Kafka in Congo and Murder in Kinshasa (October 19th and 20th) featuring post-screening discussions with directors Marlène Rabaud and Arnaud Zajtman; a dynamic duo of sensational music films, Kinshasa Symphony and Benda Bilili! (October 17th and 21st) ; and a special appearance by Djo Munga, acclaimed director of Viva Riva! (October 22nd and 23rd).

Throughout the series, there will be a silent auction of fashion items created by African designers, courtesy of Bel Esprit. Proceeds from the auction will help support the ongoing programming of Congo In Harlem.

Congo in Harlem 3 is a non-profit series. All events have been made possible by the generous support of DISH Africa TV, Caipirinha Foundation, V-Day, Panzi Foundation USA, and contributions from other organizations and individuals.

***Proceeds from Congo in Harlem will go toward a fund for emerging Congolese filmmakers***

Series Partners and Friends: Friends of the Congo, V-Day Harlem, Man-Up, Now AfriCAN, New York African Film Festival, Project Girl Performance Collective, HEAL Africa, Panzi Foundation, Cultures of Resistance, Mutaani FM, Yole!Africa, V-Day, Tabilulu Productions, Music Box Films, National Geographic Entertainment, Africa.com

Sunday,  
Oct. 16,
3:00 pm
  Congo in Harlem 3
A week of films and events celebrating Congolese culture and raising awareness about the conflict
 

    Breaking the Silence: Congo Week
Cultures of Resistance, 2010, 3 min.

Blood in the Mobile
Dir. Franck Piasecki Poulsen, 2010, 82 min.
Director Franck Piasecki Poulsen embarks on a personal mission to uncover the origin of the minerals in his Nokia cell phone. Navigating the bureaucracy, corruption, and dangers of eastern Congo, he arrives at Bisie, one of the largest and most notorious illegal mines in the region, where armed groups maintain tight control and inhumane conditions, and child labor runs rampant. Determined to know if his cell phone is funding conflict in Congo, Poulsen works his way into Nokia's corporate offices, where he confronts executives about their mineral supply chain.

Discussion with Sekombi Katondolo (producer of Blood in the Mobile and founder/director of MutaaniFM), David Aronson (freelance journalist and blogger), Eric Kajemba (founder and director of Observatoire Gouvernance et Paix), Mvemba Phizo Dizolele (writer, foreign policy analyst, and independent journalist), and Steven Hege (UN Group of Experts for the Democratic Republic of Congo).


Monday,  
Oct. 17,
7:30 pm
  Congo in Harlem 3
A week of films and events celebrating Congolese culture and raising awareness about the conflict
 
    Papa Wemba: Singing for a Democratic Congo
Cultures of Resistance, 2010, 4 min.

Kinshasa Symphony
Dir. Claus Wischmann and Martin Baer, 2010, 95 min.
In a country better known for conflict and corruption, a group of 200 individuals has managed to forge one of the most complex systems of human cooperation ever undertaken: a symphony orchestra. As the musicians prepare for a public performance of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony, they must overcome a litany of challenges, including power cuts, traffic noise, makeshift instruments, and the rigors of survival in one of the world's most chaotic cities. The result is a document of passion, cooperation, and the power of music.

Tuesday, October 18, 7:30PM   Congo in Harlem 3
A week of films and events celebrating Congolese culture and raising awareness about the conflict
 


Project Girl Performance Collective (Performers)

 

  Co-Presented by the Panzi Foundation

PANEL DISCUSSION
Re-contextualizing Rape
Congo has been dubbed the "Rape Capital of the World",but why? This panel will explore the complexities that contribute to gender-based violence in Congo, and examine the role of rape in popular understanding of Congo's crisis. Panelists will discuss activist dilemmas in tackling the problem, offer perspectives from the ground, and suggest meaningful ways to make a difference.
Panelists:
Marie-Ange Bunga, Founder of Congo Initiative at Harvard Kennedy School
Lee Ann De Reus, President of the Board, Panzi Hospital Foundation
Shana Mongwana, , Founder and director of AFRICALIVES! Productions
Esther Ntoto


Panel Preceded by:
Voices Without Borders: Project Girl Congo
Project Girl Performance Collective will perform excerpts from a theatrical piece written and performed by youth (ages 12-21) based on the experience, strength and hope of girls in DR Congo and their own personal stories of survival.  This original work was commissioned by Panzi Hospital Foundation USA.

Women Beyond War: A World March in Africa
Cultures of Resistance, 2010, 5 min.

Congo: A Common Cause
Dir. Shana Mongwana, 2011, 15 min.

Zero Tolerance
Dir. Dieudo Hamadi, 2010, 18 min.
Wednesday, October 19, 7:30PM   Congo in Harlem 3
A week of films and events celebrating Congolese culture and raising awareness about the conflict
 

  Kafka in Congo
Dir. Marlène Rabaud and Arnaud Zajtman, 2010, 59 min.
Fifteen years ago, Gorette Mawuzu's land was stolen from her. Too poor to hire an attorney, she had been representing herself in court for the past decade and a half without clear resolution. At the same time, Bahati Lukwebo, an administrator responsible for the National Congolese Assembly's finances maneuvers to maintain his position within a dysfunctional bureaucracy. From opposite ends of the social spectrum, this elegantly observed film reveals the challenges and corruption built into Congo's legal system.
Discussion with directors Marlène Rabaud and Arnaud Zajtman, moderated by attorney/activist Joseph Mbangu


October2011


Congo in Harlem 3
Friends of the Congo, True-Walker Productions, and Maysles Cinema Present
Congo in Harlem 3

October 16 - 23, 2011

Congo in Harlem 3 is the third annual series of Congo-related films and special events at the Maysles Cinema in Harlem. This year's program features a wide range of films by Congolese and international directors, representing some of the most important issues facing the Democratic Republic of Congo today. Most screenings will be followed by panel discussions, special events, musical performances, and receptions. Congo in Harlem 3 will provide audiences with more than the traditional movie-going experience -- it will offer opportunities to celebrate Congolese culture, learn about the ongoing humanitarian crisis, engage in dialogue, and get involved.

A critical focus of this year's program will be the upcoming 2011 presidential elections in Congo, scheduled to take place in late November. Key issues will be addressed in panel discussions and post-screening Q&As.

Highlights of the program include Kafka in Congo and Murder in Kinshasa (October 19th and 20th) featuring post-screening discussions with directors Marlène Rabaud and Arnaud Zajtman; a dynamic duo of sensational music films, Kinshasa Symphony and Benda Bilili! (October 17th and 21st) ; and a special appearance by Djo Munga, acclaimed director of Viva Riva! (October 22nd and 23rd).

Throughout the series, there will be a silent auction of fashion items created by African designers, courtesy of Bel Esprit. Proceeds from the auction will help support the ongoing programming of Congo In Harlem.

Congo in Harlem 3 is a non-profit series. All events have been made possible by the generous support of DISH Africa TV, Caipirinha Foundation, V-Day, Panzi Foundation USA, and contributions from other organizations and individuals.

***Proceeds from Congo in Harlem will go toward a fund for emerging Congolese filmmakers***

Series Partners and Friends: Friends of the Congo, V-Day Harlem, Man-Up, Now AfriCAN, New York African Film Festival, Project Girl Performance Collective, HEAL Africa, Panzi Foundation, Cultures of Resistance, Mutaani FM, Yole!Africa, V-Day, Tabilulu Productions, Music Box Films, National Geographic Entertainment, Africa.com

Thursday, October 20, 7:30 pm   Congo in Harlem 3
A week of films and events celebrating Congolese culture and raising awareness about the conflict
 

 

 

  Thembo Kash: Cartooning For Justice DRC/Congo
Cultures of Resistance, 2010, 5 min.

Murder in Kinshasa: Who Killed Laurent Désiré Kabila?
Dir. Marléne Rabaud and Arnaud Zajtman, 2011, 48 min.
On January 16th, 2001, Laurent Désiré Kabila, the President of DR Congo, was murdered by one of his bodyguards. Moments later, the bodyguard was shot and killed, setting the stage for one of Congo's greatest mysteries. With unprecedented access to key actors in the assassination -- including a hidden camera passed to one of the accused in prison -- Murder in Kinshasa poses vital questions about a case that will likely go unsolved in the annals of Congolese history.
Discussion with directors Marlène Rabaud and Arnaud Zajtman.

Friday, October 21, 7:30 pm   Congo in Harlem 3
A week of films and events celebrating Congolese culture and raising awareness about the conflict
 


Musician Isaac Katalay

 

 

  Lexxus Legal: Hip Hop for Social Change
Cultures of Resistance, 2010, 4 min.

Benda Bilili!
Dir. Renaud Barret and Flaurent De La Tullaye, 2010, 85 min.
Courtesy of National Geographic Entertainment

From the gritty slums of Kinshasa to packed concert halls in Europe, Benda Bilili! charts the improbable transformation of five paraplegics and a virtuoso street-kid into a global music phenomenon. Their band, Staff Benda Bilili ("Look Beyond Appearances") is living proof that against all odds, dreams can become reality.

Reception featuring live Congolese music by Isaac Katalay


Saturday, October 22, 2:00 pm   Congo in Harlem 3
A week of films and events celebrating Congolese culture and raising awareness about the conflict
 
Tickets  
**Special Riverside Church Screening***
Presented by Friends of the Congo
Location:
Room 9T, Riverside Church New York City
490 Riverside Drive, New York, NY 10027

Crisis in the Congo: Uncovering the Truth

Friends of the Congo, 2011, 26min.
A sneak peak at a short version of the forthcoming film Crisis in the Congo: Uncovering The Truth, which will explore the role that the United States, Rwanda, and Uganda have played in Congo's ongoing humanitarian crisis. The film unveils analysis and prescriptions from leading experts, practitioners, activists, and intellectuals, locating the Congo crisis in a historical, social, and political context.

Panel discussion and reception with Congolese food.

This screening is free and open to the public
Saturday, October 22, 7:30 pm   Congo in Harlem 3
A week of films and events celebrating Congolese culture and raising awareness about the conflict
 

 

 

  Viva Riva!
Dir. Djo Munga, 2011, 96 min.
Courtesy of Music Box Films

Riva is a small time operator who has just returned to Kinshasa with a fortune in hijacked petrol. With wads of cash and out for a good time, Riva is soon entranced by a beautiful nightclub siren, who also happens to be the kept woman of a local gangster. Into the mix comes Riva's Angolan crime-lord ex-boss, who is after his stolen fuel. Director Djo Munga's high-octane thriller is the first major action film shot in Kinshasa in nearly two decades, and landmark film in Congolese cinema.

Discussion with director Djo Munga + Reception with Congolese food


Sunday,  
Oct. 23,
3:00 pm
  Congo in Harlem 3
A week of films and events celebrating Congolese culture and raising awareness about the conflict
 
Jimmie Briggs (Panelist)


Kambale Musavuli (Panelist)

 

 

  Youth Power: From Cairo to Congo
Using the North African revolution as a starting point, this panel will explore the Congolese youth movement, and its potential impact on the upcoming elections as young Congolese strive to have greater say in the future of their country.
Panelists:
Jimmie Briggs, Journalist, author, and founder of the Man-Up campaign
Nathaniel Houghton, Founder and CEO of Congo Leadership Initiative
Priscillia Kounkou-Hoveyda, Co-Founder of NowAfriCAN
Kambale Musavuli, Activist and student coordinator for Friends of the Congo

Panel Preceded by:
Building Beyond Conflict: Inspiring Congolese Kids For A Brighter Future
Cultures of Resistance, 2010, 7 min.
Sunday,  
Oct. 23,
7:00 pm
  Congo in Harlem 3
A week of films and events celebrating Congolese culture and raising awareness about the conflict
 

Musician Isaac Katalay

 


  Papy (Mon Histoire)
Dir. Djo Munga, 2007, 53 min.
When Papy, a policeman living in Kinshasa, discovers that he has AIDS his life begins to spin out of control. His wife abandons him, leaving him to care for their two children, and he is even rejected by his own sister. In order to get treatment, he must have a family member serve as a confidant, but with nobody to turn to, what will Papy do? Based on a true story, Papy is hard-hitting drama that ultimately inspires a message of hope.

Discussion with director Djo Munga + closing night reception featuring Congolese music by Isaac Katalay



OCTOBER 2012
 
Congo in Harlem 4
La Congolaise by Gilson Katoko

Congo in Harlem 4
Artwork by Justin Kasereka


Congo in Harlem 4
Photography by Emily Cavan Lynch

Congo in Harlem 4

Friday, October 12th - Sunday, October 21st, 2012


Congo in Harlem 4 is the fourth annual series of Congo-related films and events at the Maysles Cinema in Harlem. Congo in Harlem showcases innovative work that celebrates Congolese culture, raises awareness about the Democratic Republic of Congo's challenges, provokes dialogue, and encourages community engagement.

This year's series highlights a wide selection of films by Congolese and international directors, ranging from political exposés to personal journeys, historical inquiries, artistic provocations, and groundbreaking animation. Many screenings will be followed by a discussion with the filmmaker.

In addition to the films, Congo in Harlem 4 will present a special off-site panel discussion at the New York Society for Ethical Culture, "KONY 2012: Lessons for Congo," exploring the implications of Invisible Children's KONY 2012 video campaign for DR Congo, as well as live musical performances by Congolese rapper Alesh, DJ Clive Bean, Philadelphia-based Congolese singer Rafiya, and New York's own Isaac Katalay. The Maysles Cinema lobby and community space will showcase artwork by Goma's Justin Kasereka, digital photographs by TIME Magazine photographer Michael Christopher Brown, and the photographic exhibition "I'm Still Here" by Emily Cavan Lynch
 
Congo in Harlem 4 is a volunteer-run, non-profit series produced by Maysles Cinema, True-Walker Productions, and Friends of the Congo. It is made possible by the generous support of DISH Africa TV, Cultures of Resistance Network, V-DAY, and Panzi Foundation USA.

Screenings are open to the public at a suggested donation of $10. Box office opens 1 hour prior to show time and advance tickets are available through Brown Paper tickets (see links in event descriptions below). A special group discount is available for the purchase of 5 or more tickets to any screening. Series passes are $50.

Proceeds from Congo in Harlem will be contributed to a fund supporting emerging Congolese filmmakers

Series Partners and Friends: Cinereach, Congo Leadership Initiative, Cultures of Resistance, DISH Africa TV, French Institute Alliance Française - FIAF, Elokomasi, HEAL Africa, Man-Up, Mutaani FM, The New York African Film Festival, New York Film/Video CouncilNomadicWax, Now AfriCAN, Panzi Foundation USA, Tabilulu Productions, V-DAY, V-DAY - Harlem, Women's International League for Peace and Freedom - NY Metro Branch, Yole!Africa, WBAI Radio, WITNESS.

Media Sponsors: Applause Africa, Face2Face Africa, WBAI Radio.

Seating is limited and available on a first come first served basis. We recommend arriving 30 minutes before event's start time to secure a seat in the main screening room.

Contact: congoinharlem@gmail.com
Congo in Harlem 4 is dedicated to the memory of
Lyn Lusi
(co-founder of HEAL Africa) and Veronique Tudieshe (Activist and Congo in Harlem volunteer)
     
 
Friday,
Oct. 12th, 7:00 pm
  Congo in Harlem 4
Co-Presented by The Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF), NY Metro Branch
 

Admission is
free and open
to the public

FREE!!!
 
SPECIAL OFF-SITE PANEL

*EVENT WILL TAKE PLACE AT THE NEW YORK SOCIETY FOR ETHICAL CULTURE*
2 West 64th Street, New York, NY

Admission is free and open to the public
Seating is limited and available on a first come first served basis


KONY 2012: LESSONS FOR CONGO
Panel Discussion

In March, Invisible Children's KONY 2012 video took the internet by storm, becoming the most viral video to date and launching LRA leader Joseph Kony into the international spotlight. Although the video rallied millions of supporters, it also drew widespread attacks and provoked a fierce public debate about activism and awareness. How do campaigns like Kony 2012 help or hinder the change they seek to make? Can more "likes" on Facebook affect change on the ground? Is awareness an effective form of activism? This panel will explore the successes and missteps of the Kony 2012 campaign, and its lessons for the global movement for peace in DR Congo.

Moderator:
Elliot Ross, Africa is A Country

Panelists:
Milton Allimadi, Publisher and Editor-in Chief, Black Star News
Kate Cronin-Furman, Human Rights Attorney & Blogger, Wronging Rights
Richard Mark Ochaka, Uganda Program Mentor, Invisible Children
Michael Poffenberger, Co-founder & Executive Director, RESOLVE
Laura Seay, Assistant Professor at Morehouse College & Blogger, Texas in Africa
Amanda Taub, Adjunct Professor at Fordham University & Blogger, Wronging Rights
Bukeni Waruzi, Africa & Middle East Program Manager, WITNESS


Panel followed by on-site reception at the Society for Ethical Culture.
 
Sunday,
Oct. 14th,
  Congo in Harlem 4

 
The Chebeya Affair

3:00 pm


  The Chebeya Affair: A State Crime?
Dir. Thierry Michel, 2012. 94 min.
In English, French, and Lingala with English subtitles

On June 2, 2010, Congolese human rights activist Floribert Chebeya was called to meet with Congo's national chief of police. Later that day, he was found dead in the backseat of his car. Before Chebeya's death, the police had been threatening him for his strong denouncement of the current regime in Kinshasa -- and now several high-level police officials are suspects in his murder. The Chebeya Affair follows their trial, uncovering a trail of lies, denials, forgeries, disappearing evidence. Will the judicial authority be capable of exercising impartial justice?




NOTE: The trailer is in French only.
The full film will be presented with an English voice-over and subtitles.
 
Monday,
Oct. 15th,
  Congo in Harlem 4

 

DJ Clive Bean

7:30 pm

  Cuba: An African Odyssey
Dir. Jihan El-Tahri, 2007, 118 min.
In English and French with English subtitles

From Che Guevara's military campaign to avenge Lumumba in the Congo up to the fall of apartheid in South Africa, 300,000 Cubans fought alongside African revolutionaries. Cuba, an African Odyssey is the previously untold story of Cuba's support for African revolutions, one of the Cold War's most vigorous contests over resources and ideology.
Watch the Trailer >


Screening followed by discussion with Jihan El-Tahri, moderated by Hellura Lyle (NY African Film Festival, DocWatchers). Reception with music by DJ Clive Bean.

Performer bio:

DJ Clive Bean - Clive Mofokeng, AKA DJ Clive Bean, is a house and party DJ hailing from Johannesburg, South Africa. His discerning musical taste and DJ skills have made him an international name. He has graced stages in South Africa, Mozambique, Botswana, Swaziland, Germany, Kenya, and now the US.
 
Tuesday,
Oct. 16th,
  Congo in Harlem 4
Co-Presented by Panzi Foundation USA
  Justice for Sale

7:30 pm

 
Justice For Sale
Dir. Ilse & Femke Van Velsen, 2011, 83 min.
In French, Lingala and Swahili with English subtitles

Justice for Sale, the third installment of a trilogy investigating sexual violence in Congo, follows Claudine Tsongo, a young human rights lawyer fighting to acquit a Congolese soldier accused of rape. Claudine and the filmmakers gather testimony from an array of experts and witnesses, and present a compelling case for the soldier's innocence. But the miscarriage of justice they uncover in the process reveals a corrupted Congolese legal system, where nobody is innocent.

Link to buy DVDs >

 
Wednesday,
Oct. 17th,
  Congo in Harlem 4

 


Back to Mandima


Footprints of My Other

7:30 pm   Back to Mandima
Dir. Robert-Jan Lacombe, 2011, 40 min.
In French and Swahili with English subtitles

"Back to Mandima, to find my village and my three best friends in the heart of the Zaire, now the Democratic Republic of the Congo. An attempt to bring closure to an ideal, idealized childhood and free myself from its spells. In the meantime there was a war, a vanish of time, 15 years. Nothing changed? Everything has. What is friendship, beyond skin colour, when one can take the plane and the other can't? When one uses 'tu' and the other 'vous'?" -Robert-Jan Lacombe



NOTE: This is a short version of the longer film.

Footprints of My Other

Dir. Claude Haffner, 2011, 52 min.
In English and French with English subtitles

Claude Haffner, daughter of a French father and Congolese mother, sets off for Congo in search of her African identity. Her starting point is the archive of photos left by her late father, a specialist in African cinema. She also speaks with her mother, who tells of life in Congo and adjusting to France. In 2004, Claude and her mother visited Congo for the first time since the family left in 1981. This experience has inspired Claude to return again, now alone, to deepen her relationship with her mother's family. Her journey brings her face to face with the diamond trade, and with her sense of otherness, both in Congo and back home in France.

NOTE: The trailer is in French only.
The full film will have English voice-over and subtitles
 
Thursday,
Oct. 18th,
  Congo in Harlem 4

 
7:30 pm
  Episode III: Enjoy Poverty
Dir. Renzo Martens, 2009. 94 min.
In English, French, and Swahili with English subtitles

In Episode III: Enjoy Poverty, Dutch artist Renzo Martens asserts that the greatest natural resource in Congo -- a country that has received billions of dollars in foreign aid -- is poverty. Employing a provocative mix of satire, investigative journalism, and personal diary, Martens embarks on a visionary quest to awaken the Congolese people to the value of their poverty. Sometimes humorous, often troubling, always sharp Enjoy Poverty presents an incisive parable on western guilt, exploitation, and the international aid complex.


Screening followed by discussion with filmmaker Renzo Martens.

 
The Maysles Cinema is located at:
343 Malcolm X Boulevard / Lenox Avenue (between 127th and 128th Streets)