MAYSLES CINEMA: ARCHIVE / DECEMBER 2011
DIRECTED BY JESSICA GREEN
 
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Thursday, Dec. 1st, 7:30pm   True Crime New York
A quarterly meditation on the complexity of "true" crime in the rotten apple.
This quarter we focus on space, the occupied, occupiers and "development".
 

True Crime NY logo

Battle For Brooklyn
Battle For Brooklyn
Battle For Brooklyn

   

Jim Epstein
Jim Epstein, 6 min.
A slice of life in the story of "Manhattantown" which was one of the first projects authorized under urban renewal and it set the model not only for hundreds of urban renewal projects but for the next 60 years of eminent domain abuse at places such as Poletown, New London, and Atlantic Yards. The Manhattantown project destroyed six blocks on New York City's Upper West Side, including an African-American community that dated to the turn of the century. The city sold the land for a token sum to a group of well-connected Democratic pols to build a middle-class housing development. Then came the often repeated bulldoze-and-abandon phenomenon: With little financial skin in the game, the developers let the demolished land sit vacant for years.
   The community destroyed at Manhattantown was a model for the tight-knit, interconnected neighborhoods later celebrated by Jane Jacobs and other critics of top-down redevelopment. In the early 20th century, Manhattantown was briefly the center of New York's black music scene. A startling roster of musicians, writers, and artists resided there: the composer Will Marion Cook, vaudeville star Bert Williams, opera singer Abbie Mitchell, James Weldon Johnson and his brother Rosemond, muralist Charles Alston, writer and historian Arturo Schomburg, Billie Holiday (whose mother also owned a restaurant on 99th Street), Butterfly McQueen of "Gone with the Wind" fame, and the actor Robert Earl Jones.

Battle for Brooklyn
Suki Hawley and Michael Galinsky, 2010, 93 min.
Battle for Brooklyn is the epic and universal tale of one man under pressure, and how far he will go to save his community and his home from the private developers who want to build a basketball arena on top of it. Along the way, he loses a fiancée, falls in love again, gets married, and starts a family. Shot over the course of eight years and compiled from almost 500 hours of footage, Battle for Brooklyn is an intimate look at the very public and passionate fight waged by the Prospect Heights community to save their neighborhood from destruction. Daniel Goldstein spent five years carefully looking for the perfect apartment. Not long after he had begun to settle in, he was informed that he and his neighbors would be cleared out to make way for the Atlantic Yards development project. This massive plan to build a basketball arena for the New Jersey Nets, and 16 skyscrapers, had been arranged by a private developer. This company, Forest City Ratner, claimed that the building of Atlantic Yards would provide jobs and additional housing, and that the arrival of the New Jersey Nets would be important to the community.
   In turn, Goldstein and a host of Brooklynites formed the group "Develop Don't Destroy Brooklyn" to counter Ratner's proposal and to expose misconceptions about the project. The effort to stop the project pits Goldstein and his neighbors against Ratner and an entourage of lawyers and public relations emissaries, the government, and those residents taken in by the promises of jobs, housing, and a basketball team on their turf. Focusing on the Goldstein's struggle to save his property from becoming center court, the film tells a story of the infuriating erosion of individual rights in the interest of corporate concerns and political maneuvering.

Post-screening Q&A with Michael Galinsky, Jim Epstein and Jim Torain
Friday,
Dec. 2nd
  Blacks in Experimental Film
Lost & Forgotten Images of Blacks on Film. Curated by 8mmAnonymous
 

Blacks in Experimental Film

   

THIS EVENT HAS BEEN RESCHEDULED TO FEBRUARY 3RD

We apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused you.
Man Up
The Man Up Film Festival

Saturday, December 3rd
In recognition of the 16 Days of Activism Against Gender Violence Campaign

The Man Up Film Festival is a non-profit series and the one-day festival is hosted in conjunction with Objective Cinema and Women's Voices Now.

***A Portion of the Proceeds Will Support Man Up Youth Activists Globally***

A SUGGESTED DONATION OF $12.00 for each programming block:
4:00pm-7:30pm and 8:00pm-11:30pm

Saturday,   
Dec 3rd, 4:00pm

4:00pm -7:30pm Programming Block. Suggested
Donation
of $12Man Up

 

Thin Ice
Håkan Berthas, 2006, 57 min.
In a rousing sports tale, Dolkar, a young Buddhist woman from Ladakh in the Himalayas seeks to play ice hockey. She and her friends try to make ice to skate on, get equipment and coaching, yet the larger challenge is the men who don't think women's ice hockey is important. When the next year's tournament is approaching the girls make a new attempt to enter. Finally when they find the American coach "Deb," they travel over the mountain to the Muslim village Kargil and create a joint team. As much about the transformative power of sport, Thin Ice creates a bridge between Buddhist and the Muslim women.

All the Ladies Say
Ana "Rokafella" Garcia, 2010, 45 min.
On a six city journey led by Ana "Rokafella" Garcia (veteran female Breakdancer-b girl)  a quest begins to unfold to see how the B-girl scene not only exists but is growing throughout the U.S. despite the challenges of its absence on the mainstream platform. "Breaking" is a male dominated dance form yet there are many women who exhibit high levels of dexterity. All the Ladies Say documents how women-young and older-continue to push their dreams and re-create the world of hip-hop.

Post-screening discussion with All the Ladies Say director "Rokafella"
  Thin Ice

All the Ladies Say


6:00 pm

Man Up

 


Women's Voices Now will showcase The Slave, a 74-minute screening of short films exploring violence against Arab and Muslim women, and the empowering people and projects who are currently working to end such violence. The films included in the program are:

The Journey
Bengal, 7min.
Join the journey home of seven girls who are survivors of traf
ficking upon their release from a post-enslavement shelter home.

Breaking the Silence
Yemen, 12 min.
Chronicles the lives and injustices against the Akhdam women in Yemen. The Akhdam, singular Khadem, meaning "servant" in Arabic, are a social group in Yemen, distinct from the majority by their darker skin and African descent. Although they are Arabic-speaking and practicing Muslims, they are regarded as non-Arabs and designated as a low caste group, frequently discriminated against and confined to unskilled and menial labor in a society already riddled with patriarchy and poverty, the distain and discrimination against Akhdam renders these women easy targets of violence and abuse Akhdam women are subject to hate-based attacks and sexual assaults without any type of legal or social recourse.

Face Viewers
Bosnia and Herzegovina, 5 min.
Records a live performance about the veil as a symbol of a female identity which the artist does not recognize as her own. In cutting the veil, the artist is risking cutting her real face and body. Under the cloth appears a naked body and gender.

Enchained
Pakistan, 5 min.
Introduces the Bheel and Kohli tribes trapped in modern day slavery in the province of Sind, Pakistan. Sodo is an elder of the Bheel tribe who escaped after two harsh years of slavery and subsequently freed 89 other men, women and children trapped at the hands of the same slave owner. The film exposes the cruel treatment of the slaves, the heavy chains they are held in, and the brutal work they are forced to perform in agriculture, brick factories and stone crushing queries.

Post Violence
Iran, 5 min.
Despite violence against women all around the world, their lives continue, powerful and strong.

I Accept, I Accept, I Accept
Pakistan, 5 min.
An experimental art film which has a feel of a documentary based on a true story from a chapter of a 22 year old Pakistani girl's personal diary. This film captures the true essence of the protagonist's feelings going into an arranged marriage. She goes through the traditions that lead to the final day, here she has to say "I accept" 3 times to get married to a man she hardly knows. The visual diary then unveils what happens next. The voice-over is in the present and the visuals are a montage of memories of that chapter.

Behind The Wall
Kyrgyzstan, 27 min.
Domestic violence is very real problem that women from Kyrgyzstan and the whole of Central Asia have to face. Often, women cannot expect any help from relatives or the police, since domestic violence is part of local culture and traditions. This film talks about one of those women, who became a victim of this tradition. In order to somehow break away from the tyranny of her husband, this woman decides to take extreme measures and kills her husband. She now serves a sentence for murder in a reformatory in Kyrgyzstan, despite the fact that she has three sons, two of which are underage. This film shows the imperfections of the system and how ignorance of people can destroy lives.

Whose Honor?
India, 5 min.
Khap Panchayats (or caste councils) seem to be condoning honor killings which have been on the rise in some Indian states, including in Haryana. Neha Sehgal and her students from the DAV College of Women in Yamunanagar boldly confront the patriarchal establishment of a village and beg the question of whether the same intolerance for love unions would exist, if women were included in the local decision-making process.

Land of Dragons
India, 3 min.
The state of Manipur in the north east of India has witnessed 15 years of armed conflict. Today, the people of the state want the government to withdraw the Armed Forces Special Powers Act, which gives army personnel special privileges that could are misused and result in murder, rape and abuse of the people.

 


Women's Voices Now


8:00 pm

8:00pm -11:30pm Programming Block. Suggested
Donation
of $12.

Man Up

 


Little Girls Lost
Andre Lambertson and Lisa Armstrong, 2010, 7 min.
illuminates the lives of many young girls in Haiti who, since the 2010 earthquake, have turned to prostitution in order to get by. They resort to having sex for food or small amounts of money. This exchange is unwanted but, in their view, the only way to survive.

The Empire in Africa
Philippe Diaz, 2006, 87 min.
Focuses on the devastating conflict which ravaged the west African nation of Sierra Leone throughout the 90s. A UN-backed war crimes court was set up to try those, from both sides, who bear the greatest responsibility for the brutalities. It completed its work at the end of 2009. Its remaining case, the trial of Charles Taylor, continues in The Hague.
*Viewer discretion advised*

Post-screening discussion with Sierra Leonean psychologist Adeyinka Akinsulure-Smith and freelance journalist Lisa Armstrong

 


Little Girls LostLittle Girls Lost

The Empire in Africa


10:00 pm

Man Up

 


Very Young Girls
Nina Alvarez and David Schisgall, 2007, 83 min.
Shines light on commercial sexual exploitation of girls in New York City, through the experiences of those being helped by GEMS (Girls Educational and Mentoring Services), an agency founded and run by Rachel Lloyd, a survivor, herself.

The Man Up Campaign is a global effort activating young women and men to stop violence against women and girls. Harnessing the universal power of the arts, sport and technology, Man Up provides innovative training, resources and support to youth and the organizations with whom they collaborate. This initiative is dedicated to mobilizing young people and strengthening their in-country programs. The Man Up Campaign formally launched during the 2010 FIFA World Cup in South Africa, bringing together a diverse group of up to +100 women and men (ages 18 to 30 years) from 25 countries. Occurring at the University of Johannesburg, this international forum was the first of its kind to develop capacity and technical expertise among young people of both genders, who are committed to stopping violence against women and girls.

The 16 Days of Activism Against Gender Violence is an international campaign originating from the first Women's Global Leadership Institute sponsored by the Center for Women's Global Leadership in 1991, at Rutgers University. The period between November 25-December 10 symbolically ties the pandemic of violence against women and girls to the principles of human rights. This year's theme is "From Peace in the Home to Peace in the World: Let's Challenge Militarism and End Violence Against Women."

Objective Cinema is an independent, online distribution network presenting world class features and documentaries. A non-exclusive, online distribution company, filmmakers from 'round the world are invited to participate and submit their work to Objective, which offers DVD sales, online rentals and download streaming. Objective Cinema is a Fair Trade Organization backed by consumers that are engaged actively in supporting filmmakers, raising awareness and campaigning for change.

Women's Voices Now (WVN) is the nonprofit social enterprise which created Women's Voices from the Muslim World: A Short-Film Festival, a collection of 98 films from 40 countries. The mission is to empower women and give voice to the struggle for civil, economic and political rights. In March, 2011 WVN premiered 41 of the Festival films in Hollywood, California. Today, the entire collection of films is being watched on-line in 174 countries. WVN has created an on-line platform where underrepresented women can be heard by an international audience, women can communicate with each other, and the dialogue on women's rights can be elevated by a multitude of views from diverse national, economic, ethnic and religious backgrounds.

 
Very Young Girls




Man Up

16 days

Objective Cinema

Women's Voices Now
Sunday,   
Dec. 4th
 

Keeling's Caribbean Showcase
Curated by Keeling Beckford of Keeling's Reggae Music and Videos

 

Keelings Caribbean Showcase
70: Remembering a Revolution

7:30 pm


  '70: Remembering a Revolution
Alex de Verteuil and Elizabeth Topp, 2010, 85 min.
How did a handful of students change the course of history in Trinidad and Tobago? Between February and April 1970, the streets of Port of Spain were filled with angry young black men and women chanting 'Power to the People'. This was the legendary Black Power revolution, which captivated the imaginations of their youthful followers and made the government of Dr. Eric Williams and the white establishment very nervous. The revolution was ended by a State of Emergency, but this in turn was threatened by a surprise mutiny among the soldiers of the Regiment. Had it succeeded (a distinct possibility) a military coup might well have ushered in a socialist revolutionary government to Trinidad and Tobago. This story is told through archival footage and photographs, members of the white business community, journalists and the revolutionaries themselves.
Monday,   
Dec. 5th
7:00 pm
  Doc Watchers Presents:
Curated by Hellura Lyle of Doc Watchers- a Harlem, community-based documentary film screening club and series
 

Doc Watchers Logo

Wake UpWake Up

Wake UpWake Up

   

Wake Up
Jonas Elrod and Chloe Crespi, 2009, 97 min
Jonas Elrod was leading an ordinary life until he woke up one day to a totally new reality. He suddenly could see and hear angels, demons, auras and ghosts. The documentary Wake Up follows this fascinating story of an average guy who inexplicably developed the ability to access other dimensions. With his loving but skeptical girlfriend by his side, Jonas crisscrosses the country as he searches for answers and delves deeper into this thrilling world of the phenomenal and spiritual.

"WAKE UP is a call to consciousness to everyone who sees it; an invitation to accept that there is more to this life than meets the eye." Sting and Trudie Styler

"A hugely important, life-changing film." – Filmmaker Joe Berlinger ("Brother's Keeper," "Paradise Lost," "Crude")

WAKE UP had its festival premiere at the SXSW Film Festival and was recently featured by Oprah Winfrey on the OWN Network's "Super Soul Sunday" programming block and on her radio program, "Oprah's Soul Series."

Film Website>

Tuesday,
Dec. 6th,
7:30pm
  True Crime New York
A quarterly meditation on the complexity of "true" crime in the rotten apple.
This quarter we focus on space, the occupied, occupiers and "development".
 

True Crime NY logo

Battle For Brooklyn
Battle For Brooklyn
Battle For Brooklyn

   

Month One
Suki Hawley, Joanna Arnow, Michael Galinsky, 2011, 10 min.
A short that gives a sense of the first month of Occupy Wall Street.

Battle for Brooklyn
Suki Hawley and Michael Galinsky, 2010, 93 min.
Battle for Brooklyn is the epic and universal tale of one man under pressure, and how far he will go to save his community and his home from the private developers who want to build a basketball arena on top of it. Along the way, he loses a fiancée, falls in love again, gets married, and starts a family. Shot over the course of eight years and compiled from almost 500 hours of footage, Battle for Brooklyn is an intimate look at the very public and passionate fight waged by the Prospect Heights community to save their neighborhood from destruction. Daniel Goldstein spent five years carefully looking for the perfect apartment. Not long after he had begun to settle in, he was informed that he and his neighbors would be cleared out to make way for the Atlantic Yards development project. This massive plan to build a basketball arena for the New Jersey Nets, and 16 skyscrapers, had been arranged by a private developer. This company, Forest City Ratner, claimed that the building of Atlantic Yards would provide jobs and additional housing, and that the arrival of the New Jersey Nets would be important to the community.
   In turn, Goldstein and a host of Brooklynites formed the group "Develop Don't Destroy Brooklyn" to counter Ratner's proposal and to expose misconceptions about the project. The effort to stop the project pits Goldstein and his neighbors against Ratner and an entourage of lawyers and public relations emissaries, the government, and those residents taken in by the promises of jobs, housing, and a basketball team on their turf. Focusing on the Goldstein's struggle to save his property from becoming center court, the film tells a story of the infuriating erosion of individual rights in the interest of corporate concerns and political maneuvering.

Q&A with Month One director Joanne Arnow, Dr. Mindy Fullilove, author of Root Shock: How Tearing Up City Neighborhoods Hurts America and What We Can Do About It, and Develop Don't Destroy's Daniel Goldstein (and the subject of Battle for Brooklyn).
Wednesday, 
Dec 7th
7:00 pm
  Hi Wednesdays
Screenings of films brought to you by the Harlem International Film Festival (Hi)
 

9 Lives
9 Lives

 

 

 

9 LIVES: 20 Year Anniversary
With the upcoming twenty-year anniversary of the City College 9 and in light of the recent loss of Heavy D, the Harlem International Film Festival presents Jason Swain's 9 Lives for the final Hi Wednesdays screening of 2011.

With the untimely passing of Heavy D, we extend our condolences to his loved ones as we commemorate the 20 year anniversary of a tragic night involving the rap artist (early in his career) that took the precious young lives of nine of the city's loved ones. Please join us for this special memorial screening of 9 Lives, Jason Swain's tribute to the nine victims including his brother Dirk, who he lost that fateful night, changing the course of Jason's life forever. The director will join us for a discussion after the screening.

In December 1991, Heavy D and Puff Daddy unravels the moments in the countdown to disaster and the circumstances that needlessly took nine youngsters from their loved ones. With Rodney King's video-taped brutal beating making headlines in the Spring of 1991 and the Crown Heights riot spinning New York City into turmoil that August, this examination of the City College 9 disaster seeks peaceful reconciliation, artfully avoiding finger-pointing to let us witness first-hand how institutionalized prejudices combined to allow something as simple as a charity basketball game in Harlem to spiral out of control.

Out of the devastating melee of lives lost a seed of hope emerged through the formation of the Dirk Swain Foundation to forever remember and combat the senselessness of December 28, 1991
.

Friday,
Dec. 9th,
7:30pm
  True Crime New York
A quarterly meditation on the complexity of "true" crime in the rotten apple.
This quarter we focus on space, the occupied, occupiers and "development".
 

True Crime NY logo

Battle For Brooklyn
Battle For Brooklyn
Battle For Brooklyn

   

Columbia Expansion Short (TBA)

Battle for Brooklyn
Suki Hawley and Michael Galinsky, 2010, 93 min.
Battle for Brooklyn is the epic and universal tale of one man under pressure, and how far he will go to save his community and his home from the private developers who want to build a basketball arena on top of it. Along the way, he loses a fiancée, falls in love again, gets married, and starts a family. Shot over the course of eight years and compiled from almost 500 hours of footage, Battle for Brooklyn is an intimate look at the very public and passionate fight waged by the Prospect Heights community to save their neighborhood from destruction. Daniel Goldstein spent five years carefully looking for the perfect apartment. Not long after he had begun to settle in, he was informed that he and his neighbors would be cleared out to make way for the Atlantic Yards development project. This massive plan to build a basketball arena for the New Jersey Nets, and 16 skyscrapers, had been arranged by a private developer. This company, Forest City Ratner, claimed that the building of Atlantic Yards would provide jobs and additional housing, and that the arrival of the New Jersey Nets would be important to the community.
   In turn, Goldstein and a host of Brooklynites formed the group "Develop Don't Destroy Brooklyn" to counter Ratner's proposal and to expose misconceptions about the project. The effort to stop the project pits Goldstein and his neighbors against Ratner and an entourage of lawyers and public relations emissaries, the government, and those residents taken in by the promises of jobs, housing, and a basketball team on their turf. Focusing on the Goldstein's struggle to save his property from becoming center court, the film tells a story of the infuriating erosion of individual rights in the interest of corporate concerns and political maneuvering.

Post-screening Q&A with Develop Don't Destroy's Daniel Goldstein (and the subject of Battle for Brooklyn), Columbia University Student Organizer Yoni Golijov, the Coalition to Preserve Community's Tom Kappner (Columbia '66) and Dr. Mindy Fullilove, author of Root Shock: How Tearing Up City Neighborhoods Hurts America and What We Can Do About It.
Saturday,   
Dec. 10th
7:30 pm
  The Experiment
Examining the common ground between documentary and experimental/avant-garde modes of cinema. Curated by Lorenzo Gattorna & Peter Buntaine.
 

The Experiment

WORKS BY LAURA KRANING: Laura Kraning 1Laura Kraning 2
34° / -117°

SkynoiseSkynoise
Skynoise


WORKS BY FERN SILVA: Sahara Mosaic
Sahara Mosaic

Peril of the Antilles Peril of the Antilles

Passage Upon A Plume Passage Upon A Plume

 

    Season Two Finale – Laura Kraning and Fern Silva
The Experiment is pleased to present for its second season finale a selection of shorts by Laura Kraning and Fern Silva. The recurring thread of the series this year concentrates on a comparative cinema wherein particular pairs of filmmakers are gathered to celebrate commonalities and contrasts found in their cinematic aesthetics. The films and videos of The Experiment are a testament to the convergence of documentary and experimental tableaus that, as our featured filmmakers pronounce, "traverse the border between the objective and the subjective, the real and the imaginary," (Laura Kraning) and "reflect the tensions between mystification of the observational and experiential and the realization of moments in time as a form of unification." (Fern Silva)

Laura Kraning:
34° / -117°

2009, 16mm, color, 1m
An elevated embankment traverses the hazy orange glow of an industrial zone on the outskirts of Los Angeles where a flood control dam is envisioned as a futuristic ruin.

Skynoise
2009, DV, color, 5m
A journey across the ethers through portals attuned to shifting frequencies; trees like antennae, lines etched into a frozen landscape, searchlights and electric patterns vibrate in the night sky.

Devil's Gate
2011, Blu-ray, b/w, 20m
Devil's Gate explores the metaphysical undercurrents of a Southern California landscape scarred by fire. The film lyrically depicts the physical and mythological terrain of Devil's Gate Dam, located at the nexus of Pasadena's historical relationship with technology and the occult, and intertwining with its central figure, Jack Parsons, who some believe to have opened a dark portal in this place. The film merges an observational portrait of a landscape transformed by fire, ash and water with a fragmentary textual narrative, providing a view into man's obsession with controlling and transcending the forces of nature and spirit. It can be seen as unearthing a subconscious of the landscape, as the echoes of the past reverberate in the present and infect our perception and experience of place.

Laura Kraning's experimental documentaries are portraits of secret worlds hidden beneath the surface of the everyday that traverse the border between the objective and the subjective, the real and the imaginary. Her early work as an abstract painter infused her filmmaking process in which she makes visible the textural and symbolic layers inherent in landscapes filmed over time. Her work has screened widely at international festivals and venues including the New York Film Festival, International Film Festival Rotterdam, Visions du Réel, Edinburgh International Film Festival, Ann Arbor Film Festival, Athens International Film and Video Festival, Rencontres Internationales, and the National Gallery of Art. Her film VINELAND was awarded the City is Cinema Jury Award at the 2010 Ann Arbor Film Festival and she is a recipient of a 2010 Princess Grace Foundation John H. Johnson Film Award for her latest film, DEVIL'S GATE. Laura currently resides in Los Angeles.

Fern Silva:
Sahara Mosaic
2009, 16mm-to-video, color, 10m
An orientalist kaleidoscope that constitutes a geographically complex yet cinematic whole. From Egypt to Las Vegas: the old and the new world are reflected and doubled in this experimental travelogue.

Peril of the Antilles
2011, 16mm-to-video, color & b/w, 6m
Peril of the Antilles was filmed at the beginning of November 2010 while visiting a friend in Haiti. At this specific time, the cholera epidemic was on its way to Port-au-Prince, Hurricane Tomas was on the horizon, presidential elections were in a couple weeks and the first Gede (day of the dead) took place since the January quakes. Along the way I acquired a very curious copy of a music video of Michel "Sweet Micky" Martelly (Haiti's newest president and once bad boy of Compas), from his early Nineties heyday… shot in a familiar location… rajé gain´ zoreille… – Fern Silva

Passage Upon the Plume
2011, 16mm, b/w, silent, 7m
"Those who go thither, they return not again."
Plumes dust the arid land, east to west, shape-shifting as they lift in ascension. Something lowers. An ark ran aground where revolution took root: ropes raise stones in baskets. Hearts heavier and lighter than the feather, permitted passage. Tethered or freed, resting from life or dawning anew. – Charity Coleman

Fern Silva (b. 1982, Hartford, CT) has created a body of film, video, and projection work that has been screened and performed at various festivals, galleries, museums and cinematheques including the Rotterdam, New York, Ann Arbor, and Images Film Festival, Anthology Film Archives, Wexner Center for the Arts, San Francisco Cinematheque, Roulette Gallery, LAXART, White Box Gallery and MOMA P.S.1. His work emerges out of travel, documenting movement through the world as a conduit into the realms of the personal and ephemeral, and the effects of geography, climate and environment on social relations, communication, and the metaphysical. He's drawn to subjects that defy a national identity or obscurity through myth, folklore, mysticism, or particular rituals. Rather than focusing on one aspect, he moves through moments to show commonality amongst beings and structures. In an effort to avoid conventional aspects of documentary, he reinforces imagination through embracing suggestions of possible narratives. Driven by curiosity and memory, his work reflects the tensions between mystification of the observational and experiential and the realization of moments in time as a form of unification. He was listed as one of the top 25 filmmakers for the 21st century in Film Comment magazine's avant-garde filmmakers poll and is the recipient of the Gus Van Sant Award from the 49th Ann Arbor Film Festival. He received a BFA from Massachusetts College of Art, MFA from Bard College and is currently based in Brooklyn, NY.
'
Dec. 12 - 18
at 7:30pm
  Documentary in Bloom
New Films curated by Livia Bloom
  Documentary in Bloom LogoElsa la Rose
Elsa la Rose

Daguerreotypes Film Still
Daguerreotypes Film Still
Daguerreotypes

Tickets

 

Elsa la Rose
Dir. Agnès Varda and Raymond Zanchi 1965, 20 mins.
This cinematic valentine, narrated by Michel Piccoli and photographed in luminous black-and-white by Willy Kurant and William Lubtchansky, documents the romance between celebrated writers Louis Aragon and Elsa Triolet.


Daguerreotypes
Dir. Agnès Varda, 1975, 75 min.
An essential film in Agnès Varda's oeuvre, this classic documentary makes its US theatrical premiere in this week-long engagement at the Maysles Cinema. Daguerréotypes is a portrait of the small shops and shopkeepers on the Rue Daguerre, a picturesque street in Paris' 14th Arrondissement that has been the filmmaker's home for more than 50 years. The title is also a pun, referring to the early photographic process of printing on silver-plated copper that was developed by Louis Daguerre in the early 19th-century. As in her films The Beaches of Agnès and The Gleaners and I, Varda, who narrates the film, gently opens up a fantastic world in microcosm. One by one, viewers meet her shopkeeper neighbors--the butcher, the grocer, the barber and their families--both in their own domains and then at a daring magic show.

Praise for Daguerréotypes:

"Daguerréotypes is required viewing for any Varda fan (really, for any serious student of cinema), and the opportunity to see it in a theater with an audience of other cinephiles should not be missed. Honestly, if I hadn't just made a trip to NYC last month, I would seriously consider a weekend trip out there for the sole reason of attending a screening. That's how much I love this film" - Kim Voynar, Movie City News

"Livia Bloom's Documentary in Bloom series at the Maysles Cinema usually introduces new nonfiction films, but it has something a little different in store for December: the U.S. theatrical release of a thirty-six-year-old French work. It’s hard to believe that Daguerréotypes, Agnès Varda's absolutely charming look at her longtime Parisian community, has never had a theatrical run in America, so it is exciting that her wonderful little tale is finally being shown on the big screen." Three and a half (out of four) stars review in This Week in New York

"Remarkable" - Pop Matters

"Varda is a brilliant filmmaker, and Daguerréotypes is a magnificent documentary." (Five stars review) - Jennifer Merin, About.com

"Agnès Varda's vérité documentary Daguerréotypes has aged splendidly, acquiring flavors that would've been inconceivable at the time it was made." - The Onion: A.V. Club

"Daguerréotypes is pleasant slice of cinema that shows a curious, confident artist [Agnès Varda] perfecting her craft, not just as a talented feature filmmaker, but also as an ethnographer who makes the voyage some fifty yards from her front door in order to redefine Paris" - Cinespect

"If the French are saving time capsules, this movie is a must for inclusion" - Trust Movies

Maria Garcia's excellent review of Daguerréotypes in Film Journal

"A portrait of an antique world that digs deep beneath its surface" - Slant Magazine

Rave review in L Magazine

"It's a lovely, small film, revealing a slice of 1970s Paris that is now long gone" - What (Not) to Doc

Melissa Anderson's review of Daguerréotypes in The Village Voice

Saturday,
Dec. 31st

  The Fuzzystar Organization Presents:  

Fuzzy StarFuzzy Star

to
Jan 1st 2012

Doors:
10:00 pm

Show start:
11:00 pm

 

PAST FUTURE!

A New Year's Eve Spectacular

Featuring live performances from:
The Sassparilla Sisters!
Live Music from Harlem's own Rap/Rocker Danny Switchblade!


With Special Guest: LAMEC

Join us for a night of Dance, Music, Theatre, Art, and plenty of bubbly!

Let bygones be bygones! Don't worry about what tomorrow may bring!

Because on 12/31/11 Fuzzystar goes PAST FUTURE!

343 Malcolm X Boulevard / Lenox Avenue (between 127th and 128th Streets)
Suggested Admission: $10 (unless otherwise noted). The box office is open for advance ticket purchases Monday through Friday, 12 - 6 pm, and one hour before the start of all events until they end. If the door is locked during these hours, knock on the store front window. Ticket-holders arriving 15 minutes before showtime are guaranteed a seat inside the theater. Overflow seating available for sold out shows.

NYSCA logo   NYSCA logo This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.